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E.J. Palumbo provided some interesting commentary to a question I posed about the direction of cartridge fads. One of his sugges

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  • E.J. Palumbo provided some interesting commentary to a question I posed about the direction of cartridge fads. One of his sugges

    E.J. Palumbo provided some interesting commentary to a question I posed about the direction of cartridge fads. One of his suggestions was improvement in the area of cartridge performance both in propellants and metallurgy of projectiles. Will it be propellents that provide more energy and lower pressure or some super slick space age metal that reduces friction in the bore? Will it be something entirely different? What say you readers of the blog?

  • #2
    It is always great to see brilliant minds come up with new materials and products for the hunting/fishing industry. One problem though is a lot of these new and sometimes expensive items don't outperform what's already on the market enough to warrant the expense. A deer at a 100 shot with a 30-06 bullet from the 60's will most likely die just as surely as a one shot with some new molly coated controlled expansion bonded polymer tipped super duper short magnum. This new technology does allow for better long range accuracy, but most hunting situations are not at these extreme and sometimes unethical ranges. I don't care who you are and what your shooting, past about 500 yards you are no longer aiming at vitals, you are just aiming at the animal. Well my mind wandered a bit there, but anyways my point is sometimes we put a lot of resources into making a better mousetrap, only to find out the one we already own works just fine.

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    • #3
      I am going to go with propellents. We have seen different coatings and tips like teflon and polymer. I think its about time for a super slow burnning, fast expansion, less recoil, more better powder! Oh and ps I have had a hard time finding cartridges from the 60's that my rifle likes to group.

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      • #4
        I don't see how new propellants could increase performance. Higher velocity comes from higher pressures, and we can already load our cartridges to the highest pressures our chambers/brass can take with the powders we have now. Maybe I'm just a moron and I'm missing something on that thought.

        I would imagine the propellants we have now would be just dandy if we could just get even stronger actions/chambers/brass that could take even higher pressures so we could stuff even more of the same powder we already use in there.

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        • #5
          It seems like every year something new comes out. For example the boys at ultracoatingsinc have a new gun finish that is even better than Cerakote. The new stuff looks like a very expensive bluing job, is even harder than Cerakote and will stand up to salt water far better than stainless steel. There are new coatings for the bore that make cleaning a breeze. Next will be something that adds speed.

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          • #6
            You know here is the deal, mass x velocity equals MV it also equals recoil, there is nothing you can do to reduce recoil while increasin velicity.. Sure you may reduce friction but that would be it. I have shot moly bullets and its not that great. You can't improve on what we have now. We have Mags, Standard, and even Reduced Recoil for people that can't shoot the standard or magnum that they bought! I think if everyone went back to the 30-30 then they would all shoot better and kill more deer than the super mags!

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            • #7
              I think it will be in extremely uniform mass produced bullets. Not that they're not uniform now, but I'm talkin miniscule tolerances. Match-grade @ bargain prices, at least I hope so. Most likely they'll keep churnin' out "new" chamberings that really won't do much more than the "old" chamberings.

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              • #8
                Have you seen the new 300 RCM and 338 RCM rounds from Hornady? Similar velocity to .300 Win Mag, and .338 Win Mag, but out of a 20" barrel! Granted, they don't offer the 300 in 200gr nor the 338 in 250gr loads but that is still mighty impressive performance. They also claim 10-15% less powder, longer barrel life, less recoil, and better temp stability (this is from a recent print ad). They are also in shorter unbelted cases. Will be interesting to see if gun writers verify the claims.

                Not sure if these new rounds will catch on but this is a mighty powerful statement for recent powder technology and cartridge design. And I am still impressed with just the .204 Ruger. High efficiency designs.

                I wonder when one of the powder manufacturers will break and start offering these types of powders to reloaders. Will be interesting.

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                • #9
                  Good call, jbird.

                  That's what I'd like to see...

                  We have custom rifles selling for well under a grand (see Petzal's Shaw - his was $975 and they start at $600 something), and cheap as dirt factory guns that shoot like the pricey factory guns (Marlin XL7 - $300, $399 Weatherby Vanguard. The former actually shoots better [on average] for less!)...

                  So lets have some premium ammo that's cheap to go along with these primo cheap rifles! Maybe then the "regular" ammo can be even cheaper.

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                  • #10
                    Propellants. I can't wait for the powders that Federal and Hornady use to make their high energy, light magnum loads become available to the public.

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                    • #11
                      I am hoping for improvements in barrel making and steel to create more accurate barrels for less money. Long range accuracy is still nice to have if you can afford it. Also, I think non-lead bullets will take over and be manufactured with much higher accuracy than we see today. I am also hoping to see acceptance of sound suppressors in the U.S. so we don't have to deafen ourselves or our dogs. They are actually legal in most states but require much regulation... With the current administration, that is not likely to happen but things could change over time.

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                      • #12
                        To move into advanced materials like this will cost a lot of R&D money. More than the Hunting Ammo business can afford. Any real improvements will probably come out of declassified military projects.

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                        • #13
                          Agreed with idahooutdoors answer above and A + 1 for you sir!!!

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