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I built my own muzzleloader and I need to brown the barrel and stain the stock. Can anyone recomend a color for the stock. Or a

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  • #16
    PPS The Mauser also has an oil finish

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    • #17
      One more thought you can still buy flake varnish in art stores. Only difference, you have to know how to mix with oil and alcohol and you have to be fast with a brush [almost slap it on]. Old tyme finish not 4 a beginner

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      • #18
        Carl, I think you're meaning flake shellac not varnish. Problem with shellac is it has a short shelf life. Often tough to tell if the stuff you're buying has gone south. Shellac provides the best moisture barrier of all finishes but it sure has its downsides too. Besides those mentioned above, it is also definitely not very durable.

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        • #19
          OH You are correct Thank God by Dad the painter wasn't here for that. Comes the phrase a good shellacking [beating]. But varnish was also blended with alcohol and linseed oil [slower dry time]. As was putty lead oxide & linseed oil

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          • #20
            As a foot-note old time "lead paint" was delivered white. Color was added and blended by the painter on site.

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            • #21
              The problem with using straight linseed oil is that it never dries. It and be applied, after the pores are filled, by rubbing it briskly into the stock and carefully wiping off the surplus.
              Then, every day or so, apply another coat, and after rubbing as before, remove by wiping the entire surface down with a dry cloth.
              In this way, dozens of wafer-thin layers can be rubbed in to create that beautiful London oil finish.

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              • #22
                99 You are correct it has to be boiled. Multi layers of oil are "deeper" than synthetics.

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                • #23
                  Laurel Mountain Forge Barrel Brown and Degreaser is a cold browning agent. That is, you don't need to heat the barrel in an oven, hope that it is evenly heated, to the right temperature, and then work quickly before it cools. A cold brown is soooo much easier and one with a built in degreaser like Laurel Mountain Forge eliminates the need to degrease before browning. With others even your finger prints can screw up the finish. Not so with this product. Just keep reapplying until you reach the finish you want. The latest pic on my profile is of my .50 flintlock that I browned with Laurel Mountain Forge Brown. Check out the finish on that barrel.

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                  • #24
                    Black walnut hulls have a really good stain for the raw wood. They usually fall off the tree a bit green. After a week or two they are soft and black. I rubbed them on the wood until it was well covered. Let it set for an hour or two, wiped it down. Looks good 5 years later.

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                    • #25
                      You don’t want shiny. It’s a beacon light to game. I like minwax brand stain special dark walnuts stain is gorgeous. Follow instructions on the can. Or varathane aged grey. Would be neat. And top coat with Birchwood Casey stock oil. Just my thoughts.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by 99explorer View Post
                        I don't care much for varnish finishes on firearms, but they are durable. You can knock off the sheen with fine steel wool.
                        The simmplified version is that you heat the barrel in the oven and paint on the browningNox Vidmate VLC
                        Last edited by ILHFATI20; 11-24-2020, 01:23 AM.

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