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So last year I ordered a Remington Genesis .50 cal ml got it for one heck of a price on closeout. I was in Iraq so havn't had a

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  • So last year I ordered a Remington Genesis .50 cal ml got it for one heck of a price on closeout. I was in Iraq so havn't had a

    So last year I ordered a Remington Genesis .50 cal ml got it for one heck of a price on closeout. I was in Iraq so havn't had a chance to fire it yet. I know no two rifles get the same results but does any one have suggestions for a non sabot round and I charge I can start experimenting with that would get could results for the upcoming Colorado elk season? And maybe even pronghorn. Got to start practicing earlier

  • #2
    Try the .50 caliber Powerbelt bullets and a charge of Pyrodex or Pyrodex 777 or even black powder. If you choose the black powder route pick GOEX or KIK. The power belts come in a variety of weights. The copper ones shoot well in my inline guns. Aero tip or hollow point matters not in my experience. For the 50, I like the 295 grain bullets. The 348 grains bullets also shoot well in most rifles.

    Start at 80 grains and work up. You will probably find the best accuracy between 90 and 100 grains. A 90 to 100 grain charge behind the 295 grain slug is a pretty stout load. You don't need to shoot the 150 grain charges you see all the TV types hawking. The increase in velocity is minimum and the increase in recoil is maximum! Remember all the grains of weight you stuff down a muzzleloader barrel in powder and lead come back out together and Mr. Newton's law is in good effect...

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    • #3
      Thanks Beekeeper I must admit I as going t start close to 150 So I will start at 80 I will have to see if I use 295 or 348 I think I will start with 295 though I am planning on practicing at 100 yds and then at 150. i do not plan on shooting over 125 yds.
      Is there a benefit to using blackpowder as opposed to pyrodex or vice versa

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      • #4
        If you want non sabot bullet in a modern muzzle loader I would have to suggest the powerbelts, O think they will be just what you need.

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        • #5
          The 777 will get you a little more velocity and will clean up with water and tends to have less fouling. The regular Pyrodex RS will give about the same velocity as Black and fouls a little less, but considerably more than 777. It requires the same thorough clean up as black.

          Black is the easiest to ignite but the rifle must be cleaned thoroughly after shooting and I will usually wipe between shots. With the other 2 you can usually fire 2-3 shots with out having to wipe.

          Make sure 777 is legal. I can't remember if it is on the list for Colorado or not. I assume they still require the use of loose powder...?

          I shoot black in my traditional sidelock and flintlock muzzleloaders. I use the synthetic stuff, usually 777 in my inlines, I figure why not use a synthetic powder in a synthetic rifle! LOL

          The 777 and the powerbelt bullets are a deadly combo. My Dad loves to hunt with his CVA inline (an older Hunter Bolt) using an 80 grain charge of 777 and the 295 grain fifty. He has shot through anything he hits including some large feral swine. Most of his shots are less than 100 yards though. At 77 years old, he says the recoil is mild but the load is stout!

          If you plan to use the 150 grain charge work up carefully. If you can find a chronograph to shoot over you might be surprised at how little the velocity gains are for the amount of powder down the bore. Hodgdon doesn't recommend the heavy charges with either the RS or 777.

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          • #6
            I like the Powerbelt Platinum in 270 gr. Never used one on an elk though. My rifle (CVA Optima Elite / .50) likes the Pyrodex better than 777. Not sure why but I was getting inconsistent groups and the folks at CVA recommended the Pyrodex. The 777 sure was easier to clean up though so if your gun likes it I would go that route. I use 100 gr in the pellets which Colorado does not allow unless things have changed but I definitely did not get any better groups with the 150 gr. load, just more recoil. The advice about working up is dead on! Muzzleloaders can be very picky.
            Good luck in Colorado, elk are sooooo tasty!

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            • #7
              Thanks 295 gr powerbelts with 90 grn of 777 is the trick. I went up to 120 even though I was already impressed with the 90 and yep I could have spared myself the time but sometimes you have to learn yourself lol. I don't use a mech. rest when shooting and kept nice 2-3" grps at 100 yds and 150 got 1 2" and and 3 others at 3- 3 1/2. I am sure I can tighten her up a bit. Thanks for the help took away alot of trial and error and alot more money.

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              • #8
                Great answer Beekeeper and A + 1 for you sir!!!

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