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right now, in 2009, how much money are you saving by loading your own ammo. if it matters, say you were only loading .25-06 ammo

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  • right now, in 2009, how much money are you saving by loading your own ammo. if it matters, say you were only loading .25-06 ammo

    right now, in 2009, how much money are you saving by loading your own ammo. if it matters, say you were only loading .25-06 ammo. what about in 2015? In 2015 do you think you will be saving even more money by loading your own ammo?

  • #2
    I don't know, but reloading is probably only cost effective if you shoot A LOT.

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    • #3
      A bunch

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      • #4
        My stats have been thrown off in the past year by a pronounced increase in components; however, prior to 2008, I was able to save >65-68% on cartridges I reload in volume (e.g., .38 Special, .357 Mag., .222 and .223) by purchasing components in quantities of 250-500 from selected vendors. For other rifle cartridges (.250 Sav., 6.5x55, .30-30, etc.), I purchase 100-200 brass cases at a time. The savings for reloading is significant. I can't assure you that you will save the same percentage on every cartridge you reload because that depends on your cartridge and bullet choices. I can tell you that you will save significantly over time, and you'll do better over time because the presses, dies and accessories last a great while, so your initial cost will be recovered in short order and you'll continue to save over time. The word "savings" may debatable or open to interpretation; we simply shoot much more for the same cash outlay.

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        • #5
          Cost to reload is about $7.00 a box

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          • #6
            Per cartridge the bigger the case and bullet the more you save. This especially rings true for .416, .470 etc. On the other hand the savings multiplies with .22-.250 or .223 because you shoot so many of them compared to the big guns. Beyond savings of money reloading also provides you with the satisfaction of creating a round specifically taylored for your rifle or situation. There also is a bit of pride in killing that big bull elk or buck deer with a load you developed and delivered. Same holds true when you put 5 shots in almost the same hole in paper. If you have the time and can afford the investment I doubt you will ever regret taking on reloading your own ammo.

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            • #7
              No doubt you save money on reloading if you shoot very much. The more you shoot, the more you save. My .375s are about $13-15 per box reloaded and about $40-80 retail. Most people don't reload for economy though, most do it to obtain an accuracy/power load that is tailored to their specific rifle. All rifles are different and a bullet's harmonic acceleration rate for your rifle may be considerably different for the next rifle on the assembly line. Barrels aren't just a tube you shove bullets through. Under the stress of firing, they flex and twist... each in a slightly different pattern depending on the steel, the action torque, the forearm pressure and the weight and acceleration of the bullet. These and other forces affect where the tube will be facing when the bullet exits the barrel. Finding a harmonic acceleration will cause your bullet to exit in a consistent vector with every shot. Many factors affect accuracy and only by loading and testing can you achieve a high level of accuracy unless you are plain lucky and then if you are, you never know if you will ever be able to obtain another box of bullets with the exact same load. If you just want to hear the noise, you don't need to reload. If you are shooting deer within 50 yards once every three years, you don't need to reload. I also find it to be fun so I would probably do it anyway. Hope this helps.

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              • #8
                I have always been able to reload rifle and pistol ammo cheaper than buying commercial. I buy bullets in bulk and also watch the sales. Bullets don't spoil! I also buy primers in bulk. As long as they are stored at consistent temps and are kept dry they will last. I try to keep powder on hand to cover my immediate needs. If prices continue to rise I may begin to hord that also. My average cost per 20 rounds is $6-10 depending on the cartridge. .223 stuff is a bit cheaper.

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                • #9
                  Years ago when .308 Win. was going for $13.00+, I was reloading for $4.00.... Shoot a little, shoot a lot. the savings and assurance is there.

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                  • #10
                    Go to: [email protected] and use the free reloading cost calc. and see how much you save. It's easy and free.

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                    • #11
                      Agreed with Beekeeper answer above and A + 1 for you sir!!!

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