Top Ad

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Over the years I have owned a considerable number of rifles but never a Weatherby. I have shot quite a few and decided that the

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Over the years I have owned a considerable number of rifles but never a Weatherby. I have shot quite a few and decided that the

    Over the years I have owned a considerable number of rifles but never a Weatherby. I have shot quite a few and decided that the action is well designed, strong, usually accurate in spite of freebore, and generally trouble free if you keep the screws tight. I always reasoned that I could obtain adequate performance from other brands at less cost of rifle and brass. I am speaking of the German, Japanese, and recent American manufacturered versions. Are they worth the money to you?

  • #2
    Well ish, I assume you are talking about the Mark V and not their Vanguard line. I have a Mark V deluxe; .257 weatherby magnum. It is the finest rifle I own. the walnut california style stock really fits me well. Ammo is expensive as you probably know.

    Are they worth the money? thats probably a decision each person would have to make. there is no doubt you can get a rifle just as accurate for one fourth the cost. I bought this rifle because I always wanted a weatherby.

    Comment


    • #3
      Jay you are correct in that I was refering to the Mark V, not the Vanguard or the early California guns made on various actions. Thanks for bringing this to my attention. Your turn to hop in here CPT BRAD or Dave.

      Comment


      • #4
        ish,
        When you said 'If I kept the screws tight'. Were you talking of the Weatherby? And if so, why? I don't own one but what's with the screws?

        Comment


        • #5
          I believe that with firearms the old "you get what you pay for" applies more than with most other items. I am not saying that the lesser priced guns are no good. I just appreciate the supremacy of the higher end. However, any rifle that you can use to consistently hit your mark will make things just as dead as the most expensive customs.

          Comment


          • #6
            Jim as you most likely are aware it is a fairly common practice to Locktite the screws on a heavy recoiling rifle or at least check them for loosening when cleaning the rifle after each use. I have noted over the years that some people don't bother with this practice and it becomes apparent when you least need it to happen. Once a friend and I were on the nineth day of a ten day elk hunt. We saw a 370 class bull which had a white spot on its left front shoulder with three smaller bulls almost every day but we could not manage the 1500-2000 vertical feet required to get within shooting range. Finally on this next to last sub-zero morning we spotted the same four bulls, tied our horses as far up the mountain as we could, and dismounted to hike the rest of the way in knee deep snow. We approached within 200 yards but the bulls had moved into a small patch of timber. I was looking through my Leupold trying to decide which brown spot was the big bull and wondering which direction they would come out or if they would simply lay down. My buddy poked me on the arm and said "is this supposed to be like this?" I glanced down to see that the action and barrel of the .300 Weatherby would move about 1/4 inch out of the stock. Horrified I grabbed my Leatherman and quickly tightened the screws muttering "I have no idea where this rifle will shoot". As luck would have it at that moment the elk came out the north side of the trees at a trot, all but the big guy which I could not see anywhere. I took the second best bull with a 7 mm/160 Partition through the lungs. My friend did not shoot but did walk up to the trees to verify that the large bull had separated from the other three and went down the far side of the ridge never to be seen again. Since most Weatherbys tend to be pretty well trained at the factory to induce recoil I just mentioned it. Also, and I mean no offense to anyone, it seems that a lot of visiting hunters who have little or no knowledge of hunting or shooting in the west show up with a .300 Weatherby and a new Weatherby ammo box containing 19 cartridges.

            Comment


            • #7
              Ish,

              That California stock is too shall we say flashy for my taste. Kinda reminds me of that very pretty blond on American Idol with all the tattoos. Not my cup of tea. Make mine a Kimber please. Did buy a WW Mdl 70 in 300 WBY while in Alaska. It was a heck of a good flat shooting rifle. Plenty of horsepower for most critters when loaded with 200 grain Partitions. The recoil didn't seem any worse than my 350 rem. Locktite is SOP for all my gun screws.

              Comment


              • #8
                ishawooa

                Weatherby to me is overrated and cost of ammo is ridiculously overpriced!

                Because I roll my own rounds, I can achieve Weatherby performance and if not, it’s so close you cannot tell the deference even ballistic wise!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Speaking of free bore, my 03-A3 probably has more free bore than the Weatherby and shoots dime size groups with Hornady ½ jacketed 100 grain bullets seated almost to the lead portion

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    ishawooa being a weatherby owner I can tell you one thing the velocity is great and I have never had any of my screws come loose on my gun and my dad bought it 1961, the down side is Ive found that the more powder you poor to em the tighter they shoot,of course every gun is differant mine being a West German I have to take the loads all the way up to the max load in the book before my groups shrink. You might check around and try to find a Rem chambered in a Weatherby round. In my oppinion Roy Weatherby did one thing right and was design the cartridge.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I've owned two Weatherbys, a 300 and a 340 but could never get enthused. First, did not like the look of the stock. I never the 340 added anything I couldn't get from my 338 and it kicked more. Neither the 300 nor 340 were has accurate as my 300 Win Mag or 338 Win. So as time went by, they got used less and less. Someone came along who was a Weatherby convert so I baptized by allowing him to purchase both rifles.

                      Many years ago, there was a bit of a fad among a few African Ph's to sneer at Weatherby users. To much recoil, accidental firing, to much gun for a beginner. etc. Mostly undeserved, I might add.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Happy: A friend of mine encountered the PH sneer year before last in Tanzania (sp?). He killed his Cape, came back to the states and sold a beautiful .378 Japanese Weatherby so he could buy one of Frank Pachmyer's remodeled M-70s in .416 Rem. Mag. which is also a masterpiece of wood and steel. He said on last year's trip he did not kill the buff any deader with the .416 but the PH gave him a smile of approval with his new choice of rifles.
                        idduckhntr: Some of those M-700s in .300 Weatherby feel a little light. The Weatherby cartridges are about the right length and diameter but the double radius shoulder is sort of silly and purely a sales gimmick. You guys probably know Roy tinkered with the .30-.378 back in the fifties. I figure, given the powders available then, he was not able to outperform his own .300 by much. It was of course revived in the nineties when Weatherby very much needed something else to sell to stay afloat and had new propellents to give the big case a couple hundred feet per second or so more zip.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I wouldnt buy any forgin guns.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            007Dom, better look close at who really owns the company that made your rifle, you might be surprised with what you find

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I have a Mark V Lightweight Sporter and I have never had any trouble with it. It will shoot 1"-1.5 " groups with good ammo just like Weatherby guarantees.

                              Like I wrote before, there are those that own a Weatherby and then there are those who wish they did.....

                              Comment

                              Welcome!

                              Collapse

                              Welcome to Field and Streams's Answers section. Here you will find hunting, fishing, and survival tips from the editors of Field and Stream, as well as recommendations from readers like yourself.

                              If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ for information on posting and navigating the forums.

                              And don't forget to check out the latest reviews on guns and outdoor gear on fieldandstream.com.

                              Right Rail 1

                              Collapse

                              Top Active Users

                              Collapse

                              There are no top active users.

                              Right Rail 2

                              Collapse

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              Right Rail 3

                              Collapse

                              Footer Ad

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X