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If you were going to have your gun rebarreled would you send your barreled action to the barrel maker and have them install it o

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  • If you were going to have your gun rebarreled would you send your barreled action to the barrel maker and have them install it o

    If you were going to have your gun rebarreled would you send your barreled action to the barrel maker and have them install it or would you prefer having them send you the barrel and letting your gunsmith fit it.

  • #2
    I would go with a gunsmith because he would do a better job and take his time; rather than some factory wrenching on it and doing a crappy job, just to try to take your money as quickly as possible.

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    • #3
      I have always used local gunsmiths to turn, thread, chamber, and screw in my barrels. The exception was my last 7 mm which I sent to Douglas Barrels in West Virginia. It turns out that a friend of mine took it to the factory for me. The friend said that Jim at Douglas went through about 14 barrels before he found the one that exactly fit my specifications. Jim and others then turned the barrel via computerized CNC, performed all the other necessary work, and turned it into my action. It is so perfect that I think this is the way I will go from now on. Absolutely flawless work and the rifle is a real shooter. This was about three years ago with a hand picked stainless #3 contour XX grade with 11 degree crown. The total charge was a little over $400.00. Great barrel, fantastic workmanship, quick service, decent price, beautiful shooting long range rifle, what more could you want? You even can call them and they will actually talk to you.

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      • #4
        It would depend.If i knew the action was going to a place like ishawoa mentioned i would have them do it, because then you would be sure it would all fit together right. Otherwise i would go with the gunsmith because of service and dependability.

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        • #5
          Jim, an alternative is to buy the finished barrel from the manufacturer ready to put on your action. Have your local smith do the installation. This sometimes saves money since you are eliminating lathe time on the part of the local gunsmith and still have him to hold accountable for adjustments providing the barrel is perfect to begin with.

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          • #6
            you have two choices here and it depends on the reputation either one has. If I bought a barrel from a barrel maker that was known for his accuracy like Douglas or Krieger or some other smith I would send it to him. However if you have a local smith that is KNOWN for tuning rifles then I would send it to him. There is a lot involved (well not really) in turning and trueing a barrel. First headspacing you've got to get it set for the bullet weight you are going to shoot. The next step is your bolt face may need trued and etc etc. If you are a decent machinist then you can do it yourself. Otherwise I would send it to a smith with credentials and let him worry about it. I once sent a Remington 700 (very common) rifle in to get rebarreled to a local smith and the guy called my two weeks later to tell me he couldn't get the barrle off!!!! What a crock I went to get my gun and have cussed him every chance I get! Hope this helps... CB

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            • #7
              My two most aggravating experiences were with two different local gunsmiths in southern California (Orange County) who convincingly misrepresented their own expertise. I would certainly trust a reputable barrelmaker (e.g., Hart, Shilen, Pac-Nor) and I do rely on recommendations. An experienced gunsmith slowly generates a reputation as a craftsman, and I am presently checking with other members of my gun club to see what recommended names pop up consistently, since I have a project in mind.

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              • #8
                Reputable Gunsmith always! A barrel maker generally will just slap it on and send it back

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                • #9
                  The barrel maker owes you no allegiance, and is one step farther away in the process. Be certain you have a good gunsmith, then stick with him to turn, thread, chamber, and screw in your barrel, His reputation is insured by your sponsorship. An old gun craftsman, who has since passed to his reward, once ordered five barrels from Shilen, sent three back, and kept two which he tuned so finely I could change the barrels with a tool he made for me. He also provided handloading dies crafted with the same tool he chambered the rifle with, creating a rifle of a lifetime.

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                  • #10
                    I would like a gunsmith to do it.

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                    • #11
                      I have had good work done by E.R. Shaw, Douglas, and Montana Rifle Works. Make sure your local smith knows what he is doing. It is all a matter of trust.

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                      • #12
                        Jim . . .

                        If you trust and respect a local gunsmith, I'd have him do the job, particularly if you have other rifles in the same caliber that you're going to rebarrel your rifle with, and if you handload. For example, I have a .257 AI that's currently in a shop being worked on by a high-end gunsmith, and which will receive a new barrel. I've given the gunsmith previously fireformed and trimmed 257 AI brass to very carefully headspace and fit the new 257 AI barrel with. Via this method, I won't have to create an entire new batch of brass for the "new" 257 AI rifle (when I get it back). I am doing the exact same thing regarding 7x57 AI brass and a Winchester Model 70 Featherweight in 7x57 Mauser that is being rechambered to 7x57 AI and headspaced to correctly chamber my existing batch of 7x57 AI brass. Eventually I will have two 7x57 AI rifles and two 257 AI rifles that, in their respective calibers, I will always only have to fireform in one rifle to be reloaded and safely used in the other in that same caliber.

                        TWD

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                        • #13
                          Agreed with Beekeeper answer above and A + 1 for you sir!!!

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