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will puting a brass cleanig rod with a lubricated patch ruin the rifling in a barrel if you put in the muzzle first

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  • will puting a brass cleanig rod with a lubricated patch ruin the rifling in a barrel if you put in the muzzle first

    will puting a brass cleanig rod with a lubricated patch ruin the rifling in a barrel if you put in the muzzle first

  • #2
    putting it muzzle first pushes all the crap you are cleaning out into the action of the gun

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    • #3
      Good looking dog mutt,even if it's not purebred.

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      • #4
        No, not if done carefully. In fact, in some type rifle actions, that is the only way possible. A bore guide can be used to keep the rod centered as it enters the bore, to minimize contact with the muzzle. Don't worry about pushing the fouling into the action. If you saturate the patch with a good solvent, like Hoppe's #9, most of the fouling will adhere to the patch, which can be removed from the breech.

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        • #5
          Exercise caution not to bend the rod around into the rifling. You need not use a bore guide, provided you don't use your cleaning rod like an ice pick. Like 99explorer, I use Hoppe's #9. First I send two wet patches, followed by a dry patch. Then I repeat as needed. Clean your action, and you are solid. Happy shooting!

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          • #6
            I use two .30 caliber cleaning rods, and one (it's either a John Dewey or a Parker-Hale) is coated, easy on the barrel. I would avoid the steel rods issued with the M1 Garand and M14; they're bargain-priced but they are reportedly rough on the bore of a sporting rifle.

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            • #7
              k

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              • #8
                Mettle to mettle s always bad and even a coated rod, micro contamination will cause addition abrasion increases the wear. What you need is a cleaning rod specifically used by competition shooters. It has a sleeve that is cone shape that centers the cleaning rod keeping it away from the rifling.

                Coated rods sound great, but its that cone sleeve to center the rod which are coated also is what you want! A alot of competition shooters with heavy large diameter target barrels I've seen use shotgun shells with the primer drilled out to the same size of the cleaning rod.

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                • #9
                  j4huntfish if you are talking about cleaning your lever gun it is almost imossible to clean from the chamber without disassembling the action which i would not reccomend.Look arond and find a fexible cleaning rod.you can slide it down the barrel and put your attachments on and pull the from breech to muzzle.I made one out of a lawn mower choke cable for this purpose.

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                  • #10
                    On my lever guns I use an Otis flexible cable that is coated with plastic; these are great for use in the field. We have taken an empty case and drilled out the primer to 5/16" in the lathe with a taper so the cable doesn’t drag on the side the chamber. These plastic covered cables and rods must be kept clean or they can get abrasives imbedded in them and do damage to the bore. We have also made cleaning rods out of 1/4" brass rod for 7mm and up, 3/16 for the rest, with a swiveling handle that uses the stainless ball bearings that I get free from a guy that rebuilds deep sea reels. We turn HDPE to fit over the muzzle to act as a guide so the rod doesn't rub the rifling at the crown. With the lever guns we also put a piece of cloth down in the action laying on the follower/elevator to catch solvent and gunk. Remove it carefully and most of it will still be in the cloth. If the bolt can be removed then always clean from the breach and don’t drag the dirty patch back through the bore. Put a tray under the muzzle to catch the drips and swab away!

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                    • #11
                      Any metal to mettle contact will cause wear over time. Use a good bore guide to prevent damage to the crown or chamber throat. A coated steel rod will not damage rifling. Wipe off any rod after each pass. Good tips above, too.

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                      • #12
                        Get a 'bore-snake'. Any gun shop will have your caliber, heck Wally World even has some of the popular calibers. I usually run a solvent patch down the barrel, but I cut the patch where it doesn't have to be 'forced' down, just gently pushed. Next, a clean patch. This get's alot of the 'heavy' stuff out, then a drop of oil on the bore-snake, pull it thru, from action to muzzle. Twice for good measure. Voila! Clean as a whistle. Takes about 2 minutes total. I've got em' for just about every caliber I own. Even cleans a filthy .50 cal muzzleloader lickety split.

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                        • #13
                          Bore-snakes are great I have one for each caliber & Gauge I own.

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                          • #14
                            I try to avoid inserting cleaning rods from the muzzle as much as possible. Litte scratches or wear on the crown will negatively impact accuracy more than anywhere else. Over time the metal contact and tendency to slide the rod over the end of the bore has an impact. Bore snakes are great where you don't have good access to the breach.

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                            • #15
                              moishe - thanks

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