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I have an old mauser from 1914. I don't know what the original caliber was but i have always shot 30-06 in it. i was wondering i

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  • I have an old mauser from 1914. I don't know what the original caliber was but i have always shot 30-06 in it. i was wondering i

    I have an old mauser from 1914. I don't know what the original caliber was but i have always shot 30-06 in it. i was wondering if there is any way to easily put a scope on this gun and what the original caliber might be. i tried posting this earlier but i dont think it worked any ideas about the scope?

  • #2
    Take it to a gunsmith and have the chambeer miked, as for the scope you might hve to have a side mount drilled.

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    • #3
      You probably have a 98 mauser. There were, for the most part, excellent rifles. If your shooting 30-06 and the rifle fires and the cases extract easily with no cracking of the neck or web swelling of the area just over the base, you probably have a rifle chambered for the 30-06. Any gunsmith worth his salt can make a cerrosafe chamber cast and confirm the caliber. A no and no-go gauge in the same caliber will tell you if your selection of the 06 cartridge is the right one as well.

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      • #4
        i have a mauser from ww2 that my grandpa got me its chambered for 8mm, so yours may be as well, i compared my 8mm cartridge to a 30/06 and they are really similar, yours may also be an 8mm, but i do not know that much about rifles, just the basics, but just some fod for thought. as for the scope mine has some block looking things on top that might have been meant for scopes, but i have never seen a scope on it, so i am not sure. good luck

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        • #5
          Could you tell us more about any identifying marks, the manufacturer's name on the receiver, any proof marks, rollmarks, anything traceable? I agree with Libertyfirst; it's probably an M98 and it may have been rebarreled. Does it have a sporter stock or a military stock? Straight bolt or bent? The more information, the better!

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          • #6
            Mr Palumbo unfortunately I am at college and do not have it infront of me. The stock has either been cut or replaced because it is a sporter stock. from what i remeber it was made is south america somewhere and i think all of the numbers match i will confirm this when i get my hands on the gun

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            • #7
              My dad had one of those old Mausers with an aftermarket Remington barrel in .300 Savage. However, it cocked on closing (ugh!). Don't think that was the Model 98, was it? I always wondered if it was possible to pick up another bolt that cocked on opening. Somebody really did a beautiful job sporterizing it.

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              • #8
                More than likely you have and Argentine Mauser.From the Spanish revolution.The original if i'm not mistaken was 7x62x39 or 308.I have a model 98 Mauser that i carried to the smith and had it drilled and tapped for a top mount scope with good results i had it rebarrled with a flaigs.270 win.ace barrel.
                Good Luck with your rifle

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                • #9
                  A good guess would be the 7.65x53mm, or 7.65mm Argentine model 1909 that was converted to 30-06 by running a 30-06 chambering reamer into it. Please have someone competent check the headspace and cast the chamber, throat and bore. A friend used one of these so converted rifles with iron sights to take several moose.

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                  • #10
                    Between World War I and II, several South American nations that could afford to do so equipped themselves with Model 98 variants (Argentina, Chile, Bolivia, Peru, Venezuela, Ecuador, Brazil and Colombia) because the German-made Mausers were the best infantry rifles and carbines available. Then, as now, there was an "arms race", a competitive effort to have the best equipped military.
                    Each of these nations had their rifles made on contract and there were variations in cartridge choices, sights, trigger guards, etc., that make these rifles interesting.
                    The Model 1909 Argentine (an update from the Model 1891) is one of the finest M98 variants, but it was originally chambered for the 7.65x53mm Belgian Mauser, which uses a bullet diameter of .312, same diameter as the .303 British and the 7.7mm Japanese Arisaka. If it was simply rechambered, not rebarreled, accuracy would suffer with a .308 diameter bullet.
                    Many gunsmiths paid their bills working on Mauser rifles, and the results vary from butchery to art, but the M98 is a fine foundation for a rifle.
                    Installing a scope would entail drilling and tapping 3 or 4 holes in the receiver (depending on the mounts you chose). If the bolt is straight, not bent, the bolt handle would not clear the eyepiece of the scope, so you'd need to reshape the bolt (by forging or cutting & rewelding the existing bolt handle). This isn't neurosurgery, but you'd want the job done by an experienced gunsmith. An alternative would be to mount your scope where the rear sight is located, I believe B-Square has such a mount, and use a "scout scope" or intermediate eye relief scope; one currently available from Burris comes to mind.
                    Another option: E.R. Shaw will rebarrel your Mauser to your specs and bend the bolt for about $400.
                    You have options, and I suspect you have a good rifle as a foundation. When you get an opportunity to examine the markings on the top and sides of the receiver, give us more details. Good hunting and best of luck in your studies.
                    Ed

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                    • #11
                      Mr. Palumbo, any chance a set of High Mount scope rings will do it? My Gunsmith tapped my sporterized 1914. Said he's done it a million times. Tried to put a scope on last night with Medium Height rings only to find its not happening. Then if a set of High Mount rings does the trick my concern is The bolt handle will still hit the scope when chambering a round. Any experience with that?

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                      • #12
                        I've got over 40,000 rounds through my M98 Mauser (many barrels) and to date It is the most accurate 1000 yard shooter I have. Now that you have scope holes, you need to get the bolt bent. Even if you were to make a standard bolt work with higher scope mounts, your fingers would still hit the scope making it unusable. It is best for a gunsmith to cut the bolt and weld the handle at a more severe angle and it will be great. Mine is pillar/epoxy bedded and currently wears a .300 Dakota barrel from Lothar Walther who chambers and threads the barrels for your action. It shoots in the 0.1" group size at 100 yards with target bullets and 3" 5-shot groups size at 1000 yards with big Berger bullets. It has a custom trigger and safety as well. This M98 is also my most durable firearm, having failed to fire only ONCE (with a weak bolt shroud detent spring) after 40,000 rounds. It's reliability for hunting just has never been beaten by any other design.

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                        • #13
                          Is the rifle you are talking about the one in your avitar ?

                          I don't think the guy wants to go to that extreme.
                          A large ring M-98 action should be able to be drilled on top of the action by a gun smith. There are real nice after market bolt handles that can be be welded on.
                          As long as your 30-06 brass looks good after firing you should be o.k.. No splits or bulges.

                          Comment

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