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Remington 700 'American Hunter'

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  • DakotaMan
    replied
    I'm happy with Big Green too and use their actions often in custom precision rifles. I recently trued a new action and they are very well finished. The front ot the receiver was only off by about 010" side-to-side and the interior bolt lugs where only off by .004". The interior bolt lugs on theone I did had a strange rounding near the wall of the perimeter that put bolt lockup about .010" off, only allowed bolt lug lockup on the exterior of one lug. It had to be trimmed to be true. Otherwise the action was great. It shoots excellent after the new barrel was addded. I fully realize that most 700s are not advisable for shots beyond about 300 yards but have bedded several factory models that are deadly at 500 yards for hunting. 5R rifling is good in that it reduces fouling but hasn't proven to be more precise than other forms of rifling.. I use 5R exclusiveoy when I can for that reason.

    Leave a comment:


  • fitch270
    replied
    FWIW, buzz on the net is that some Wal-Mart's are clearing out some 700 ADL's for $184. Not all stores and not all ADL's but if you've been following the last few years it's the same kind of thing they've been doing in August.

    The other thing I've been reading is despite the reputation of Big Green lately one of the things they've been doing right is the 700's actions. Apparently the CNC machining is putting out some good stuff. If you can get one of these ADL's for about $200 with tax, sell the stock and takeoff barrel for half that, then you're into a new 700 action for about $100. Good place to start a build.

    Leave a comment:


  • CD2
    replied
    Maybe I've just been lucky w 700's.
    Minor tweaks and good enough.

    My old VS (blued fluted) was fine (.22-250)
    My BDL .243 was the best ('74 model).
    My ADL synths have been good after stock stiffening.
    BDL magnums, 7mm and .300.........were good............the .300 got full bedding and factory ammo was at or under an inch at 100. The 7mm got nothing and was 1.2 w the hottest 160 handloads.

    There's a newer .300 mag at the LGS that's tempting me.
    I'd rather get an old Varmint Special in .222

    Honestly, I'm not a 700 fan. They are not bad looking but they are still bolt guns.
    Hell, K mart used to sell em.

    But dang if they weren't one of the safer bets back in the day.

    My next rifle proly be another Ruger #1.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pmacc60
    replied
    I glad to see Remington getting back to a solid contribution to the hunting 700 rifle! Like Dewman said it would be better with more caliber choices but at least it’s a step in the right direction.

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    Originally posted by DakotaMan View Post

    It looks like a very nice rifle for woods deer hunting. As far as being quintessential for deer hunting, I suspect that for use in the mid-west or prairie deer hunting, that chambering / barrel length is terribly slow for distant shots and closer range running deer that account for many of those deer. My deer load shoots over 600 fps faster than the 140g 6.5 CM with this short barrel. Of course, in the thick eastern timbers this rifle should be excellent, just like the 30-30, the .35 Rem, the 7mm-08 and the .308.

    They apparently have trued up the action and put on a different bolt knob but I don't see anything about precision of the barrel or chambering which would give the rifle a chance for the precision required for midwest / prairie deer. Perhaps those are done... perhaps not. Time will tell. Are you aware of other enhancements in mentioned that they have made to the rifle?

    I forgot to mention epoxy bedding, another necessary enhancement for the precision to at least be able to target a standing still deer at 400-500 yards. My quintessential deer rifle would be able to shoot very predictably at ranges like that.
    I don't remember everything, they did use a special barrel where land is opposite grove. Other stuff I can't remember. You are looking at it from a personal perspective, I read about it from a useful addition to the firearm industry. Jim

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    Originally posted by DakotaMan View Post

    It looks like a very nice rifle for woods deer hunting. As far as being quintessential for deer hunting, I suspect that for use in the mid-west or prairie deer hunting, that chambering / barrel length is terribly slow for distant shots and closer range running deer that account for many of those deer. My deer load shoots over 600 fps faster than the 140g 6.5 CM with this short barrel. Of course, in the thick eastern timbers this rifle should be excellent, just like the 30-30, the .35 Rem, the 7mm-08 and the .308.

    They apparently have trued up the action and put on a different bolt knob but I don't see anything about precision of the barrel or chambering which would give the rifle a chance for the precision required for midwest / prairie deer. Perhaps those are done... perhaps not. Time will tell. Are you aware of other enhancements in mentioned that they have made to the rifle?

    I forgot to mention epoxy bedding, another necessary enhancement for the precision to at least be able to target a standing still deer at 400-500 yards. My quintessential deer rifle would be able to shoot very predictably at ranges like that.
    Anywhere a Remington 700 has proven itself over the years the American Hunter will be right at home. Maybe you should get closer to your game before you take a shot.

    Leave a comment:


  • DakotaMan
    replied
    Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post

    Remington has already done a lot of what you say you would do. Also, you are comparing apples to oranges. Remington wanted to make the quintessential deer rifle which I think they have done.
    It looks like a very nice rifle for woods deer hunting. As far as being quintessential for deer hunting, I suspect that for use in the mid-west or prairie deer hunting, that chambering / barrel length is terribly slow for distant shots and closer range running deer that account for many of those deer. My deer load shoots over 600 fps faster than the 140g 6.5 CM with this short barrel. Of course, in the thick eastern timbers this rifle should be excellent, just like the 30-30, the .35 Rem, the 7mm-08 and the .308.

    They apparently have trued up the action and put on a different bolt knob but I don't see anything about precision of the barrel or chambering which would give the rifle a chance for the precision required for midwest / prairie deer. Perhaps those are done... perhaps not. Time will tell. Are you aware of other enhancements in mentioned that they have made to the rifle?

    I forgot to mention epoxy bedding, another necessary enhancement for the precision to at least be able to target a standing still deer at 400-500 yards. My quintessential deer rifle would be able to shoot very predictably at ranges like that.

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    Originally posted by DakotaMan View Post
    Everybodydoesn't need a high precision rifle or a good looking rifle to hunt deer and the standard Rem 700 is pretty decent from the lowly ADL to their best BDL. They are not known for precision but can deliver it on some models. Remington is making solid hunting rifles in a variety of styles and this one looks good for short range deer hunting.

    I like Rem 700s and here are my comparisons to the American Hunter (AH)s:
    1. Rem 700 Sendero, Police and tactical rifles... these are likely to be more accurate as a long range hunting or tactical rifles. They are heavier and have longer barrels for the necessary velocity. They have better stocks (HS Precision vs Bell and Carlson), finely finished 26" fluted barrels but triggers are the same X-Mark and must be replaced.

    Standard Rem 700
    I suspect the AH has a better barrel than most standard 700s but probably not as good as the high end rifles mentioned above... who knows? It doesn't take much to be better than the standard Rem 700. The X-Mark trigger is OK for close range hunting applications on both standard Rem 700s and the AH.

    I custom finish machine Rem 700 receivers to make precision rifles and would expect to do this to a new American Hunter to make it a $2000 class rifle like the Bergara:

    Barrel: I'd remove the barrel and replace it with premium barrel that is air gauged to .0002" or better. It would be 21 3/4" long for 100-200 yard benchrest, timber hunting and 26" long for the long range shooting with which the 6.5 CM excels. Good barrels cost more to make so I don't blame them for not going all out on the AH. Especially since I consider it to be specifically a short range hunting rifle that can't shoot a 7mm-08 or a .308.

    Action: I'd true the front and rear of the bolt lugs, interior receiver lugs and the front of the receiver and the front of the bolt. Necessary for shooting long range varmints, targets or long range hunting precision.

    Chambering: I'd cut the chamber with less than .0002" variance from the bore alignment so that rifling won't engrave long VLD bullets deeper on one side over the other. These would fly crooked beyond 250 yards where the bullet transitions from spinning on the axis of the bore to spinning on its center of mass. If this isn't done, the AH owner won't be able to take advantage of the 6.5 CM for precision long range shooting.

    Recoil lug: I'd replace with a 1/4" thick, trued lug for higher precision fit between barrel and receiver and for a more solid bedding to control barrel torque from shot-to-shot in this fast twist rate bore with those heavy for caliber bullets.

    Trigger: The X-Mark only comes down to about 2 pound trigger pull which is typically not good for high precision target/varmint shooting. I'd use a trigger like the Jewell that adjusts from 1.5 ounces to 4 pounds so the owner can choose what they need for various uses. I personally wish Remington would learn how to make a good adjustable trigger since they actually make rifles. It didn't take Jard long to figure it out.

    Firing pin/spring: I'd replace the AH's with a slightly heavier spring and a light weight firing pin about 1/3 the weight of the solid steel Rem 700 firing pin. This improves lock time to noticeably enhance precision.

    Bolt knob: good job on the AH knob that doesn't rip your knuckles against the scope, helping to keep blood off the good looking rifle. Even better if the bolt handle is threaded so the user can slip on whatever knob fits their chubby or skinny little fingers.

    Cartridges: Since it is a short range woods hunting rifle, I'd offer it in at least a half dozen chamberings with popular short action deer cartridges: .243, 6XC and 6 CM in 8 twist, 25 CM in 7.25 twist, 7mm-08 and 308 in 9 twist barrels for shooting heavy long range VLD bullets.
    Remington has already done a lot of what you say you would do. Also, you are comparing apples to oranges. Remington wanted to make the quintessential deer rifle which I think they have done.

    Leave a comment:


  • DakotaMan
    replied
    Everybodydoesn't need a high precision rifle or a good looking rifle to hunt deer and the standard Rem 700 is pretty decent from the lowly ADL to their best BDL. They are not known for precision but can deliver it on some models. Remington is making solid hunting rifles in a variety of styles and this one looks good for short range deer hunting.

    I like Rem 700s and here are my comparisons to the American Hunter (AH)s:
    1. Rem 700 Sendero, Police and tactical rifles... these are likely to be more accurate as a long range hunting or tactical rifles. They are heavier and have longer barrels for the necessary velocity. They have better stocks (HS Precision vs Bell and Carlson), finely finished 26" fluted barrels but triggers are the same X-Mark and must be replaced.

    Standard Rem 700
    I suspect the AH has a better barrel than most standard 700s but probably not as good as the high end rifles mentioned above... who knows? It doesn't take much to be better than the standard Rem 700. The X-Mark trigger is OK for close range hunting applications on both standard Rem 700s and the AH.

    I custom finish machine Rem 700 receivers to make precision rifles and would expect to do this to a new American Hunter to make it a $2000 class rifle like the Bergara:

    Barrel: I'd remove the barrel and replace it with premium barrel that is air gauged to .0002" or better. It would be 21 3/4" long for 100-200 yard benchrest, timber hunting and 26" long for the long range shooting with which the 6.5 CM excels. Good barrels cost more to make so I don't blame them for not going all out on the AH. Especially since I consider it to be specifically a short range hunting rifle that can't shoot a 7mm-08 or a .308.

    Action: I'd true the front and rear of the bolt lugs, interior receiver lugs and the front of the receiver and the front of the bolt. Necessary for shooting long range varmints, targets or long range hunting precision.

    Chambering: I'd cut the chamber with less than .0002" variance from the bore alignment so that rifling won't engrave long VLD bullets deeper on one side over the other. These would fly crooked beyond 250 yards where the bullet transitions from spinning on the axis of the bore to spinning on its center of mass. If this isn't done, the AH owner won't be able to take advantage of the 6.5 CM for precision long range shooting.

    Recoil lug: I'd replace with a 1/4" thick, trued lug for higher precision fit between barrel and receiver and for a more solid bedding to control barrel torque from shot-to-shot in this fast twist rate bore with those heavy for caliber bullets.

    Trigger: The X-Mark only comes down to about 2 pound trigger pull which is typically not good for high precision target/varmint shooting. I'd use a trigger like the Jewell that adjusts from 1.5 ounces to 4 pounds so the owner can choose what they need for various uses. I personally wish Remington would learn how to make a good adjustable trigger since they actually make rifles. It didn't take Jard long to figure it out.

    Firing pin/spring: I'd replace the AH's with a slightly heavier spring and a light weight firing pin about 1/3 the weight of the solid steel Rem 700 firing pin. This improves lock time to noticeably enhance precision.

    Bolt knob: good job on the AH knob that doesn't rip your knuckles against the scope, helping to keep blood off the good looking rifle. Even better if the bolt handle is threaded so the user can slip on whatever knob fits their chubby or skinny little fingers.

    Cartridges: Since it is a short range woods hunting rifle, I'd offer it in at least a half dozen chamberings with popular short action deer cartridges: .243, 6XC and 6 CM in 8 twist, 25 CM in 7.25 twist, 7mm-08 and 308 in 9 twist barrels for shooting heavy long range VLD bullets.

    Last edited by DakotaMan; 08-14-2019, 07:14 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • PigHunter
    replied
    Originally posted by Amflyer View Post
    Well, I like most of it. I never could see the draw to shooting the 6.5 with a big long tube, and the 20" bbl. looks about right for a hunting rifle.
    The Ruger American with 22-inch barrel is ok without a suppressor. But, add that extra 8 inches and it gets unbalanced.

    Leave a comment:


  • PigHunter
    replied
    Originally posted by FirstBubba View Post
    I agree. I don't see it as a big improvement nor would I care about carrying all the extra weight of a bull"ish" barrel on a hunt.
    Bubba, the barrel on that Remington is fluted and the rifle weighs 6.75 lbs.

    Leave a comment:


  • Amflyer
    replied
    Well, I like most of it. I never could see the draw to shooting the 6.5 with a big long tube, and the 20" bbl. looks about right for a hunting rifle. The fluting and Ceracoating are spot-on. The Floorplate is...meh. The trigger is a throwaway, and you foot the cost of the Timney or Jewell unless you are of low mental fortitude and like the X- whatever trigger. The stock is nice upgrade, and my M700 has the same one. If the action is truly "blueprinted and machined" to custom level, I would pay around 1200 bucks for this rifle.

    This is coming form a Winchester guy with one M700 (older) so take that with a grain of salt.

    Leave a comment:


  • FirstBubba
    replied
    I agree. I don't see it as a big improvement nor would I care about carrying all the extra weight of a bull"ish" barrel on a hunt.

    Leave a comment:


  • fitch270
    replied
    The msrp is almost into Fieldcraft money, and you could build a 700 with the important features and possibly do it better for less money. Timing couldn’t have been worse with all the NRA nonsense going on as well.
    Like Dewman I’m a 700 guy but no thanks.

    Leave a comment:


  • PigHunter
    replied
    Wouldn't give it a second glance. I'm very pleased with the Ruger American Predator in 6.5 CM at half the price and with a 2-inch longer barrel.
    https://ruger.com/products/americanR...eets/6973.html

    Granted, the Ruger is a little rough in finishing and thus the lower price.
    Last edited by PigHunter; 08-14-2019, 03:17 PM.

    Leave a comment:

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