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So with everything currently happening in the Socialist State of Maryland, ammo prices are going to jack up through the roof.

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  • Treadmark
    replied
    Lots of good advice here. I started reloading in the 1970's. I was taught an mentored by a new friend. He remains a good friend today. He let me use his equipment and manuals, while I bought my own stuff one piece at a time. At the time, I had to take a second job to be able to afford guns and ammo. Keep the spirit, seek a mentor, tap his brain for all it's worth and embark on a great life long hobby that will save you money and make you shoot better. I'd love to be that mentor, and pay back what I was given, if you lived nearby. But, I'm in Florida; a long ways from Naziland if that is where you are at.

    Leave a comment:


  • art6555
    replied
    Sorry Dakotaman, I posted before I read your post.....I say follow Dakotamans advice....lol

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  • art6555
    replied
    When you get set up, I can recommend a good powder to start with. Look at the group in my avatar, that is Varget with my 308 Win, my 7mm-08 shoots the same with Varget for both 120 grn and 139 grn bullets.

    I will be honest, the fact that you are 13 and have a job......I almost cried. I wished more adults were like that. I got some reloading stuff (presses, powder dispensers, scales) on EBAY for cheap. They were good quality also. He still uses them. We also have some auctions and garage sales that advertise reloading components.

    Leave a comment:


  • DakotaMan
    replied
    I agree with EJP... look for used equipment. Check ebay and gunbroker.com. All O-style (where the main press shape is an enclosed "O" shape rather than a "C" shape) presses will work fine but I favor RCBS. Try to buy kits where you get many tools for practically free. Get a good reloading manual (Hornady, Barnes or Nosler). Get some Varget powder for your 7mm-08 and forget all the other powder choices. Reloading will definitely save you money if you intend to shoot and your rifle will likely be much more accurate too. Good luck!

    Leave a comment:


  • Chewylouie
    replied
    Sorry, that wasn't on topic!

    Leave a comment:


  • Chewylouie
    replied
    Mdhunter- That makes sense. I always tried to save my money but somehow, it always disappeared. Since I have gotten this job though, I have bought 2 guns. I guess that just kinda shows my lack of self control. Both of them were needed though. We had no 12Ga. and we didn't have a hand gun. The particular handgun I bought is probably worth about $2,000. I got it for 400. It is actually a standard military issue 1911 that was made in 1941, and from the way it looks now, it has probably seen combat in WWII. I think that is cool. I am almost scared to shoot it now though because I know it is worth that much.

    Leave a comment:


  • Safado
    replied
    All of the advice is excellent. I bought a RCBS complete kit that included just about everything except the dies, powder, cartridgfe case, primers and bullets. In your price range I would start with the Lee loader system although I don't have experience with it. I agree with Jhjimbo that your first step would be to purchase a reloading book like the ABC's of Reloading. EJP also gave good advise about buying a used press. Those will last a lifetime if propoerly cared for. I would also look to a mentor or experienced reloader that could help you get started and possibly let you use his press.

    Leave a comment:


  • FirstBubba
    replied
    There's lots of options out there. I started with a Lee Loader myself.
    It was many years later that I learned the Lee Loader only neck sizes your brass. Not a problem if you shoot a bolt gun or a straight wall case.

    Leave a comment:


  • Treestand
    replied
    JMO~ Check out RCBS Reloading Starter Kit in the $175.00
    +/-.

    Leave a comment:


  • Edward J. Palumbo
    replied
    Mdhunter1,
    I might recommend purchasing used presses, which are often found at reasonable prices at gun shows. I might recommend purchasing new dies, but a name brand press is a simple, ruggedly constructed mechanism.
    I too started with a Lee Loader in 1968, and that's a good recommendation. It'll take more time, patience and physical effort, but it'll soon pay for itself.
    If you have a friend with a bench-mounted press, ask if you can purchase the dies and shell holders you need and use his press, reloading manuals, scale and other resources.
    I work with friends to load their brass, and that has worked well. That'll stretch your resources and permit you to equip yourself gradually, affordably. It'll also provide opportunities to get reloading equipment as birthday or Christmas gifts, or gift certificates to accomplish that.
    Save all of your brass, and shop carefully.

    Leave a comment:


  • bruisedsausage
    replied
    I would recommend the lee challenger single stage kit, or the 4 hole value kit.

    www.midwayusa.com/product/423081/lee-challenger-breech-lock-single-stage-press-anniversary-kit

    www.midwayusa.com/product/622290/lee-4-hole-turret-press-with-auto-index-value-kit

    both sold out currently at midway, but they are good with honoring the backorders.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mdhunter1
    replied
    Chewy, I am kind of one if those people that doesn't spend money, like maybe 10 bucks a month. I have saved up a lot, I never spend birthday money and whenever I am payed for dog sitting or dog training, the money generally goes in my account.

    Leave a comment:


  • jhjimbo
    replied
    Check Midway USA.com They have reloading sets that they put on sale from time to time. Almost everything you need to get started.
    Read reloading books - ABC's of Reloading is a good one.
    Start saving your brass if you don't save it now.
    If you know someone who is experienced in reloading see if they will help you get started.

    Leave a comment:


  • country road
    replied
    Do check out the Lee loading stuff. That's what I've been using since I started reloading a few years ago, and I've turned out some fine, accurate loads. It's not top of the line, but it's in your price range AND IT WORKS.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chewylouie
    replied
    I am 14, and have a job, and my budget is $300!

    Leave a comment:

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