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I really want to get into reloading; Everything from shotshells to rifle/pistol cartridges. I don't know anything about it and

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  • I really want to get into reloading; Everything from shotshells to rifle/pistol cartridges. I don't know anything about it and

    I really want to get into reloading; Everything from shotshells to rifle/pistol cartridges. I don't know anything about it and don't know how to get started. Advice please!

  • #2
    You need to get a press. You can find them at local shooting supplies and just ask the clerks and they will line u up with power shot wad primer and all.

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    • #3
      Act quick! no joke, primers and other things for reloading are getting to be very hard to come by these days. The new admin has been keeping gun sales so high, nearly all the shelves of ammo are empty. Clay Cooper just posted a few days ago that he got the last primers available in the northern part of his state.

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      • #4
        Some gun clubs offer NRA certified reloading courses for both metallic and shotshell. Learning firsthand from someone that knows what they're doing can save you time and money. Reloader and component manufacturer websites also contain useful information.

        Invest in loading manuals and read the reloading sections and heed the warnings. Life, limb, and firearms depend on it. Regarding the reload websites, I ignore blogger load recommendations - a too hot load is not worth the risk. Best to cross reference more than one manual as there are rare mistakes and changes are made over time. Stay safe.

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        • #5
          There is no substitute for a knowledgeable, objective friend who is willing to act as a mentor and walk you through some of the reloading processes, and I didn't have such a resource when I started reloading. I agree with MLH; there's a wealth of information in Speer and Hornady's reloading manuals, among others. I couldn't support all my interests, so I only reload metallic cartridges, not shotshells.
          On a positive note, I can't think of presses to avoid if you stick to name brands. It's a competitive market and the garbage has been weeded out. Be attentive to experienced reloaders who are selling their equipment. At this point in my life, some of my peers are withdrawing from the sport because their lights are dimming, or other health issues and priorities have taken precedence. Operate conservatively, consistently, carefully, and your results will be your greatest reward. Shop carefully, because it's easy to put a dent in your bank account on accessories you really don't initially NEED (but understandably WANT). Let us know how you're doing.

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          • #6
            Check with your local gun club, some of the older members look foreward to teaching others how to reload ammo. Just be prepared to buy powder, primers, bullets and a couple cups of coffee.

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            • #7
              Find a friend (knowledeable)who has an intersted in reload. If one is not available the reloading guides publish by bullet companies like Nosler and Hornady and relaoding companies like Lee have great how to sections complete with photos.

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              • #8
                MLH pretty much said it, too bad you’re not local; I’d get ya started right

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                • #9
                  If you have access to a gun club, anyone there will be more than happy to help you, if not try you tube. Make sure you look at alot of the vidoes, and make sure that anything you do learn you cross reference back to a reloading manual. They have a detailed description in the first few chapters. Make sure you understand what you are doing. If you are not get on a forum and find someone close to where you live, that is willing to help you. If your close to Spartanburg, SC I will show you what I know. It is easier to learn from someone else. My suggestion is to find someone that can help you get started.

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                  • #10
                    Yeah, I've been trying to find someone local (OH), but no luck so far. I'm gunna keep at it though. I wanna get into it so bad, I'd drive across a few states to learn. Anyways, thanks for the help guys!

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                    • #11
                      Basic tools are a press, powder scale, powder trikler, and a powder dispecer and a primer feeder.

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                      • #12
                        You need not one but several reloading manuals or access to same. Used equipment is usually half the price of new or less, because people are leery of buying it for safety reasons. Actually, unless a press is rusted into oblivion or parts are obviously bent or broken, they are pretty bomb proof. I have an old RCBS that another reloader gave me when he upgraded to a fancier model for high volume reloading. When I say old, I mean "I like Ike!" old. With a new set of dies, because he only gave me the press, it turns out reloads as good as or better than an brand new one. MEC, the company that makes the most common shotshel reloaders, used to refurbish any MEC reloader regardless of its condition for $40 plus the cost of parts. That's a lot of confidence in your product if you ask me. Try garage sales, estate sales, and your local range if you are lucky enough to have one. Reloaders like new gear as much as anyone, so they will often sell their perfectly good old stuff for next to nothing in order to "justify" buying something with more bells and whistles.

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                        • #13
                          The Hornady manual has errors in it. When I emailed them about all I got was a smart ass answer.

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                          • #14
                            I agreed with Beekeeper answer!

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                            • #15
                              I agreed with Beekeeper answer!

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