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I have herd that the inside layer of the inner bark of a tree can be eaten raw or cooked, is this true ( no particular tree was

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  • I have herd that the inside layer of the inner bark of a tree can be eaten raw or cooked, is this true ( no particular tree was

    I have herd that the inside layer of the inner bark of a tree can be eaten raw or cooked, is this true ( no particular tree was mentioned)

  • #2
    I not sure, I think that it depends on the type of tree. I believe that I saw Les Stroud eat parts of a pine tree on one of his shows. I believe he said that almost all parts of the tree (pine) was edible, or could be made into a tea. I don't know if this applies to other trees. Might want to go to Barnes and Noble and pick up a book on survival.

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    • #3
      Being a enrolled as a Northern Cheyenne Tribal Member, I was taught that you can eat the inner bark of dead pine branches, not tasty, but has nutritional value. You should look at a book on ethnobotany, particularly one with info from Plains Indians. I was fortunate to be taught some of the berries that were safe and roots that were edible as well.

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      • #4
        Yes you can eat the inner bark of certain trees. It is called the cambium layer. In Aspen trees if you eat the inner bark you get acetycylic acid, the primary ingredient in asprin. So remember, "Aspen, asprin" You can eat the cambium layer of pine trees as it does have nutritional value as well as others. I would have to get into some of my books for the specifics but I do know some tribes also took great amounts of cambium, dried it and then pound or ground it out into a flour to add to stews for the nutritional value. Hope this helps.

        Take care and God bless,
        Jamie

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        • #5
          certain pines can be done this way, but if u try to eat wild black cherry be dead within days

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          • #6
            I'd be very cautious about it. I can't see any of them tasting very good but I guess if you're hungry enough taste isn't a big issue.

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            • #7
              Alder can be eaten.

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              • #8
                yes most trees in the us can be eaten or boiled into a tea

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                • #9
                  Yes you can eat them!!!

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