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  • #16
    I'm all about "standby" energy/water.
    What we all need to address is a SHTF situation.

    A generator is pretty worthless if there is no fuel due to societal collapse.
    Wind and solar are also pretty useless without storage batteries and the batteries are expensive, short lived and high maintenance. Not to mention that wind/solar are intermittent at best.

    So, if you don't have the wherewithal to be able to live for extended periods without electricity, your plans need an update.

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    • #17
      I'm on city water but grew up on a farm. I've never had a water problem. The city has never failed in warning us of likely small outages. In a world-wide meltdown I might run to nearby rivers or lakes for a dip of water if necessary. I could certainly boil it or just wait for a rain to catch some.

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by FirstBubba View Post
        I'm all about "standby" energy/water.
        What we all need to address is a SHTF situation.

        A generator is pretty worthless if there is no fuel due to societal collapse.
        Wind and solar are also pretty useless without storage batteries and the batteries are expensive, short lived and high maintenance. Not to mention that wind/solar are intermittent at best.

        So, if you don't have the wherewithal to be able to live for extended periods without electricity, your plans need an update.
        Actually I disagree. Everyone of us has some constraints. It could be health related, financial, geographic, family to worry about, etc. It's impossible to plan for every contingency. So, you should first spend your limited resources (time, money, etc.) on preparing for the more likely scenarios.

        For instance Bubba, you're more likely to lose your power due to a tornado or winter ice storm. At most you'd probably be without electricity a few days. It's fantasy to think that you in your late 60's would last more than a few months in a true SHTF situation.
        Trump 2020 - Keep America Great!

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        • #19
          Originally posted by PigHunter View Post

          Actually I disagree. Everyone of us has some constraints. It could be health related, financial, geographic, family to worry about, etc. It's impossible to plan for every contingency. So, you should first spend your limited resources (time, money, etc.) on preparing for the more likely scenarios.

          For instance Bubba, you're more likely to lose your power due to a tornado or winter ice storm. At most you'd probably be without electricity a few days. It's fantasy to think that you in your late 60's would last more than a few months in a true SHTF situation.
          "... more than a few months ..."???

          I dunno pighunter! I'm a pretty tough old bird! 😉! LOL!

          Seriously? Do any of us know when THAT call will come?
          It wasn't that long ago I thought I wouldn't see a societal collapse in my lifetime. Now I'm not so sure.
          Regardless of how long I last after the collapse (if it happens!), I'm hoping to live as comfortably as possible until "THAT" time comes.
          I don't know, maybe dementia will set in and I won't care.

          P.S. - thank goodness the only winter outage we experienced (2 days), we had wood heat, plenty propane and a guitar. The guitar got old pretty quickly! LOL!
          The freezer was a nonissue. Just moved everything to an unheated back porch until power returned.
          Last edited by FirstBubba; 07-26-2020, 10:15 AM.

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          • #20
            I have to ask myself just how badly I want to stay alive if Armageddon arrives. If the world I love disappears, what's the point? The zombies can eat me. I've lived a great life to the max. Few regrets. No bucket list left that hasn't already been filled once. I'm ready to go. A future without hope for more adventure is not worth living. Just give me time to make my own box. That's one prepper item I don't want stored around the house. Might convey the wrong image.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Ontario Honker Hunter View Post
              I have to ask myself just how badly I want to stay alive if Armageddon arrives. If the world I love disappears, what's the point? The zombies can eat me. I've lived a great life to the max. Few regrets. No bucket list left that hasn't already been filled once. I'm ready to go. A future without hope for more adventure is not worth living. Just give me time to make my own box. That's one prepper item I don't want stored around the house. Might convey the wrong image.
              OHH, there's a few good points in your words. But you're approaching the hypothetical situation from a narcissist viewpoint.

              My reason for hanging around longer would be to possibly help others. A life lived only for one's self is hollow and I want no part of it. I'm an optimist and try to see the silver lining in any dark cloud. Just maybe something I do will help someone else survive to tell the tale.
              Trump 2020 - Keep America Great!

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by PigHunter View Post

                OHH, there's a few good points in your words. But you're approaching the hypothetical situation from a narcissist viewpoint.

                My reason for hanging around longer would be to possibly help others. A life lived only for one's self is hollow and I want no part of it. I'm an optimist and try to see the silver lining in any dark cloud. Just maybe something I do will help someone else survive to tell the tale.
                Well said, pighunter! Agreed!

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
                  For a generator at camp I built a little weather proof house for it at the end of my extension cord away. It is a quiet model to begin with and away from everything I can not even hear it.

                  Click image for larger version

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                  I like it. Good idea.

                  I had a 7kw gasoline generator for about 10 years and only used it 3 short times. I sold it right after the divorce from my first wife.
                  Trump 2020 - Keep America Great!

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by PigHunter View Post

                    I like it. Good idea.

                    I had a 7kw gasoline generator for about 10 years and only used it 3 short times. I sold it right after the divorce from my first wife.
                    I suppose if you had some reason to require an uninterrupted power source, those big generators make sense.
                    For me, if I can get electricity to 1 A/C or heating (gas) unit, the 'fridge, the TV and a lamp or two, we're good to go.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by FirstBubba View Post

                      I suppose if you had some reason to require an uninterrupted power source, those big generators make sense.
                      For me, if I can get electricity to 1 A/C or heating (gas) unit, the 'fridge, the TV and a lamp or two, we're good to go.
                      Bubba, the storm of March 12-13, 1993 dumped 16 inches of snow in my area, which is the most I've ever seen here. Combined with high winds, our powerlines couldn't take it and we were without power for several days with the lows going to single digits. With no snow removal, our hilly streets were impassible. Fortunately, I had a wood burning fireplace and with it kept the house from freezing. Our hot water tank used natural gas so that helped.

                      The Ex used an iron skillet to cook over coals and I moved all of our freezer items to the deck and covered them with snow. We hung blankets on the open doorways into the great room for insulation, moved a mattress there from upstairs and sheltered in place for a few days. The biggest problem was in getting our clothes dry after playing in the snow.

                      Later that year, I bought a generator large enough to run the clothes washer and dryer, run the refrigerator and freezer, and power the gas-fired heating unit fan. Of course all this couldn't be done simultaneously so the plan was to switch loads on/off as needed.

                      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1993_Storm_of_the_Century
                      Trump 2020 - Keep America Great!

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by PigHunter View Post

                        Bubba, the storm of March 12-13, 1993 dumped 16 inches of snow in my area, which is the most I've ever seen here. Combined with high winds, our powerlines couldn't take it and we were without power for several days with the lows going to single digits. With no snow removal, our hilly streets were impassible. Fortunately, I had a wood burning fireplace and with it kept the house from freezing. Our hot water tank used natural gas so that helped.

                        The Ex used an iron skillet to cook over coals and I moved all of our freezer items to the deck and covered them with snow. We hung blankets on the open doorways into the great room for insulation, moved a mattress there from upstairs and sheltered in place for a few days. The biggest problem was in getting our clothes dry after playing in the snow.

                        Later that year, I bought a generator large enough to run the clothes washer and dryer, run the refrigerator and freezer, and power the gas-fired heating unit fan. Of course all this couldn't be done simultaneously so the plan was to switch loads on/off as needed.

                        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1993_Storm_of_the_Century
                        Pretty much the same here, except my generator will run everything
                        (almost!) at once.
                        During the same ice storm a friend of mine went 13 days of without electricity!

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          In the blizzard of '66 I was in the plow business to help put me through school. We got 66" of snow in 24 hours. 25' drifts and low temps. I was using a new Dodge Power Wagon, 15 cement blocks in the back and chains on rear wheels and I could just barely get around - on most streets the blade was plowing snow in the full up position. Paid for the truck and more in that one storm.

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                          • #28
                            Snow!?
                            In the fall of 1983, we decided we'd move to Pagosa Springs, CO!😃
                            OH BOY!

                            When winter "FINALLY" ended! ...in MAY!
                            Total accumulated snowfall for the area was 869"!
                            Yes sir! Eight hundred and sixty nine inches! A new record for the area.

                            We gathered up our toys and went back to east Texas!

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              I am a tiny bit surprised that for all the SHTF talk that no one has mentioned putting in a small cistern. I would think that would be a strong backup in Western states. Around the great lakes area, just having a well of sufficient depth and a means to power and purify should be good. But in more Arid climates, I'd think you'd want a way to store it a bit. I don't think it needs to be like a big 100K gal farm water tank, but if you were planning this stuff out you can get a 3K gallon tank rated for potable water storage for about $1K.

                              I think typical American on Avg. uses 88 gal/dy or 300gal/dy for an avg. household; but a good portion of that can be avoided by checking usage of toilets, showers, faucets, and clothes washing (in that order).

                              I've been looking at buying some land and building a place completely off grid. This might sound a bit surprising, but I strongly considered wood chips / sawdust compost toilets. If handled correctly they don't stink, but there's some extra chorin' to do. On the plus side, you get good compost and it beats having to go outside to an outhouse.

                              As for electricity, some of those tesla powerbanks and multiple trickle feed sources may be enough. I know some folks that grid tie theirs and run the house and farm off the batteries, but feed the batteries banks at night for some areas when it's cheaper. I like multiple redundancies

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                              • #30
                                A cistern has its +'s and -'s.
                                Water can get stale.
                                Contamination by vermin, birds, insects and sediment.

                                On the other hand, water is water is water. If you have none, even stale, dirty water is just pretty darn good! 😃!

                                The AWWA considers 100gal/person/day as the national average.

                                My well is low yield. If I had a way to pump it intermittently during the day and night into a tank, I could probably do quite well.
                                As it is now, I pump the well down twice a day for a total of +/- 70 gallons and use all of it to water trees and garden.
                                If I could pump 5 gal/hr, over 24 hours, I could (theoretically) have 120 gal/day.

                                ...but is it worth the investment?
                                Good question!

                                Comment

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