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  • Swiss Army Knife

    How much knife do you REALLY need and use out there?
    For 80% of the time, this smaller S.A.K - E.D.C. Pocket knife will be all you ever use and need!



    Swiss Army knife saw blade and a rake handle used in making a plastic bottle rope cutter for "survival" cordage

    ...for 80% of the time, you don't need much more knife..


    Click image for larger version  Name:	77223479_937876513241841_1066190992320757760_o.jpg Views:	0 Size:	121.5 KB ID:	718940

    If you go on a planned trip, then you will have an axe, saw rope ,bigger fixed bladed knife etc
    Last edited by Wim; 11-29-2019, 03:11 AM.

  • #2
    The American "multi tool" has pretty much replaced the Swiss Army Knife.

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    • #3
      I've used the needle nose pliers on my Gerber 10 times more than all the other attachments combined. Do SAK's have that feature yet?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by dewman View Post
        I've used the needle nose pliers on my Gerber 10 times more than all the other attachments combined. Do SAK's have that feature yet?
        I can't tell just how many times a lowly "multi tool" has gotten me out of a bind...and I despise multipurpose tools like a "Crescent" wrench and "Channel-Loc" pliers!

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        • #5
          A multi-tool is always on my belt when visiting or working in a papermill. However, I rarely carry a multi-tool into the field because most are heavy for their size.

          As far as survival use, I'm rarely more than a couple of miles from my vehicle and would expect rescue within 36 hours if for some reason I can't walk out on my own. 100 feet of paracord is always in my pack so there's no need to make additional cordage. A thick sail needle is in my kit and I could use that with inner fibers from the paracord or with dental floss to make repairs that require sewing.

          Bubba, back in the 90's I did some conveyor control for a barge loading facility in Colombia, South America. At one point I had to change the breaker in a couple of motor control center buckets. That was done with my 10-inch crescent wrench and #2 phillips head screwdriver. I regularly use crescent wrenches and channel-locks around the house when doing projects... but that's the way I learned from my Dad.

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          • #6
            A Swiss Army knife came in handy when I was younger but the stuff you gotta do know. It may not pass the test.

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            • #7
              Crescent wrenches and Channel-Locs are plumbers tools, not mechanics. Things will bloody knuckles used on tight/rusted nuts and bolts.

              I have a SAK and a Leatherman Wave, the Wave gets more general purpose use, the SAK for delicate around the house stuff like cutting out slivers. Both have their place.

              To the original post, since when does need matter anyway? 😎

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              • #8
                Not really a tool you want to use in a "live" breaker box! LOL!
                ...but I have done "some" electrical work with a multi-tool.

                fitch270
                I despise them, but I keep some around.
                I keep a set of "Channel-Loc" pliers on my loading bench. I use them to lock dies into the press.
                A Crescent is an abomination to a mechanic, but it's almost a necessity to keep on a tractor or in a farm truck tool box.
                Kinda like Forrest Gumps box of chocolates!
                "Ya nevuh know wha'cha gonna need!"

                My old hands have been so beat up I have a hard time opening screw cap bottles. Bought a cheap set of "food grade" Channel Locs to keep in the kitchen. Work great for all kinds of stuff, like pulling hot cookie sheets out of the oven!

                This is the tool I'm currently carrying. It's a Gerber "Diesel" model.
                Last edited by FirstBubba; 11-29-2019, 02:51 PM.

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                • #9
                  We went to get a 14 foot offset disc. We got everything lined up, then realized we didn't have a clevis pin. Fortunately, there was a Crescent wrench in the tractor that would fit into the oblong worn drawbar hole.
                  Worked like a champ and saved us at least an hour!

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                  • #10
                    What happened to the good old-fashioned monkey wrench?

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                    • #11
                      Nothing wrong with a Swiss Army Knife. I prefer the various Leatherman Tools. I never go anywhere around the world without one.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Happy Myles View Post
                        Nothing wrong with a Swiss Army Knife. I prefer the various Leatherman Tools. I never go anywhere around the world without one.
                        Guess that's what I get for traveling with no checked baggage!
                        If I want my "Gerber" when I go to Kodiak, I have to mail it up and mail it back home. LOL!

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                        • #13
                          What does that plastic bottle do ?

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                          • #14
                            I have carried the Victorniox 'Executive' model 365 days a year for over 40 years. Even dressed a deer with it.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
                              I have carried the Victorniox 'Executive' model 365 days a year for over 40 years. Even dressed a deer with it.
                              Better than a butter knife I guess.

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