Top Ad

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How do you find wood for a survival fire, if the snow pack on the ground is 3-4'? I thought about this while out snow shoeing an

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • tmike51
    replied
    Right at the base of a tree of under the edge of the undercut bank on a frozen stream.

    Leave a comment:


  • rudyglove27
    replied
    Under a tree!

    Leave a comment:


  • rudyglove27
    replied
    Under a tree!

    Leave a comment:


  • jcmesq
    replied
    That's about right.

    Leave a comment:


  • kylepountney
    replied
    A lot off times theres drifts around pine trees and if the branches are touching the grond there might be some dry stuff inside.

    Leave a comment:


  • James Stugart
    replied
    dead branches on the bottom of pine trees work good

    Leave a comment:


  • BigWoodsHunter57
    replied
    I dont think ive ever been in woods that doesnt have at least one dead tree within a couple hundred feet..Just search for something dry even if you have to dig it out of the snow

    Leave a comment:


  • Charley
    replied
    I always pack a little tinder and kindling with me.

    Leave a comment:


  • Christian Emter
    replied
    Under trees it is probably the driest.

    Leave a comment:


  • aklund
    replied
    If you are heading out in those conditions, its better to stick a couple pieces of tinder into your pack. It might add a pound, but its much better than being in need of something you can't find.
    Take the lint from your dryer, stuff it into an old toilet paper roll. Works nice to get things going. Burns long if its stuffed.

    Leave a comment:


  • AlaskanExile
    replied
    If you can find a dead standing birch or other tree from "beer-can" diameter to slightly larger, you can knock it over and break it apart in to lengths you can burn. The other pieces that fall off can be used as tinder. Birch is best as other have stated, as the bark really burns hot, but fast.
    Get a double fist-full of very small pencil lead diameter sticks to act as your first stage of kindling after your tinder. Then you'll need an armful of pencil diameter pieces before you get to burning real wood. Dead branches are best for this because they will be very dry. Be cautious of anything you pick up off the ground as it will most-likely be wet when it thaws out if you live in a snowy climate. Don't waste your tinder/effort.
    AlaskanExile

    Leave a comment:


  • sere9501
    replied
    If you have 3 or more feet of snow on the ground then like Charley said look under the base of an evergreen tree. When you have a tree well develop you can still find dry, small wood you can use to get a fire going. I have been up here in Washington, hiking in 3-6 ft of snow and I can find wood in a tree well to get a fire going.

    If you are going to use a dead standing tree, look for a tree about wrist size, not to rotten that you can bolt up to start a fire. At wrist size you can break off chunks with a hatchet or wedge it between two trees to get 12-18 inch long pieces.

    Birch works great because of the natural oil in the bark. A lot of birch bark will give you a big fire pretty quick. Birches rot from the inside out so get as much bark as you can and use other trees for fuel if the wood is no good.

    A good idea is to practice getting fires started under these conditions, before you HAVE TO get fires started under these conditions.

    Leave a comment:


  • peter
    replied
    if you already have a flame from tissue or something look for a birch tree and pull of the birch bark(if the birch bark is dry use to start a fire)the wood under the birch should be dry because the bark is water pretty retardent.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ruff Grouse and Woodcock
    replied
    I would use a standing dead tree for fire wood. You can also, though take pine sap from a pine tree, and that will burn for a while. You need to find a pine tree, and cut a limb off and sap should bleed out of where the limb was.

    Leave a comment:


  • jbonifer24
    replied
    In area where logging has taken place, look for the giant slash piles. These are piles of scrap branches and trees that were not used. They can provide a ton of dry wood in various sizes.

    Leave a comment:

Welcome!

Collapse

Welcome to Field and Streams's Answers section. Here you will find hunting, fishing, and survival tips from the editors of Field and Stream, as well as recommendations from readers like yourself.

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ for information on posting and navigating the forums.

And don't forget to check out the latest reviews on guns and outdoor gear on fieldandstream.com.

Right Rail 1

Collapse

Top Active Users

Collapse

There are no top active users.

Right Rail 2

Collapse

Latest Topics

Collapse

Right Rail 3

Collapse

Footer Ad

Collapse
Working...
X