Top Ad

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Have you ever heard of this behavior from Coy-wolves / Woyotes?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Have you ever heard of this behavior from Coy-wolves / Woyotes?

    I was listening to a story, from a guy in the northeast, who said he was out in the woods looking into some odd goings on. He encountered a pack of coyotes / coy-wolves losing their fear of Man. He went on to say that the Alpha was very clearly bigger than the rest of the pack, and that as the pack got nearer to them not only were they posturing aggressively; but that the Alpha actually stood up on its back legs while making eye contact and growling at him. I know canines in the wild will sometimes stand up on their back legs like that, but I've never heard of it as a posturing tactic.

  • #2
    Can't say i've heard of anything like that. We have a fair amount of wolves these days in northern WI, but other than some of my buddies trail cams I don't know of anyone unfortunate enough to cross a pack. It is pretty impressive to see them on camera in comparison to a yote.

    Comment


    • #3
      I know of two examples. A friend was hunting ground hogs and was approached and surrounded by a pack of wild dogs. About 6 or 8. He shot one with a bow and when the others backed off he made a run for the car.
      Another time at camp a Warden came racing in and asked if we saw a pack of wild dogs. I said I had about 1/2 mile down the road. He said shoot them on sight and don't let the young kids stray from camp. I could have shot a couple as they were right on the side of the road when I drove by but did not know they were to be shot.

      Comment


      • #4
        I personally never heard of thing like that, now it's very common to heard about wild canines attacking pets. Now if they are attacking people they might have to be put down unless someone gets hurt

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
          I know of two examples. A friend was hunting ground hogs and was approached and surrounded by a pack of wild dogs. About 6 or 8. He shot one with a bow and when the others backed off he made a run for the car.
          Another time at camp a Warden came racing in and asked if we saw a pack of wild dogs. I said I had about 1/2 mile down the road. He said shoot them on sight and don't let the young kids stray from camp. I could have shot a couple as they were right on the side of the road when I drove by but did not know they were to be shot.
          Yeah Jimbo I would have shot the one as soon as it started growling at me. The guy who told me the story said he had to shoot one to get out of there. I was just wondering if one of them standing on back legs for a period of time was maybe more common than I thought.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
            I know of two examples. A friend was hunting ground hogs and was approached and surrounded by a pack of wild dogs. About 6 or 8. He shot one with a bow and when the others backed off he made a run for the car.
            Another time at camp a Warden came racing in and asked if we saw a pack of wild dogs. I said I had about 1/2 mile down the road. He said shoot them on sight and don't let the young kids stray from camp. I could have shot a couple as they were right on the side of the road when I drove by but did not know they were to be shot.
            I was on a deer drive and heard dogs barking ahead of us. Three shots were fired and one friend got nice doe. The other friend got two wild dogs chasing the deer. True Story

            Comment


            • #7
              Coyotes have learned to respect humans but are exceptional at living in close proximity. They rarely feed on or harm humans but since they are predators, they will take advantage of an opportunity for an easy dinner. I lived many years in the middle of hundreds of coyotes with very few incidents or encounters.

              It was constant war to retain the majority of our chickens but we lost as many as a few hundred a year. The only human encounter I've seen involved a "city dweller" friend who went coyote hunting with us. It was his first hunt and he really had no idea what he was doing.

              He arrived wearing a light jacket and no gloves. We intended to walk a four mile stretch of Missouri river breaks, pushing out coyotes from the sandbars where we would get good shooting across the mile wide, frozen river. I told him he was WAY under-dressed for 10 degree temps. He claimed he was hot blooded and knew what he was doing. He was carrying a rusted over and very old .35 Remington that I knew had little chance at long range running coyotes. I felt bad about the situation but we decided to allow him to come along at his own risk.

              Several of us, separated by a couple hundred yards each, started our walk and at the end, he was missing. I feared he had frozen so I started back his way to look for him. To my surprise, within a mile, I encountered him dragging a giant male coyote. But in spite of his prize, he looked weak and wobbly and had a look of stark fear on his face.

              He said that he got very cold during his walk. He felt weak and tired about half way through the hunt and laid down on the ice between overgrown sand bars to rest for a minute (hypothermia).

              He said the next thing he knew, he felt a warm touch on his nose. He struggled to open his eyes and looked up at the biggest coyote I have ever seen (he was easily the size of a large German shepherd and had a dense winter coat). He said he then saw about 25 coyotes standing all around him, looking at him like he was the main course for tonight's dinner.

              He said, he could feel the Adrenalin coursing through his veins from his nose all the way to his toes as it slowly flowed through him, giving him life once more. Again, he mustered all his might to raise his rifle off the ice and push it against the big coyote's chest. He said the coyote pushed forward against his rifle and he couldn't muster the energy to move his finger on the trigger. Then, he said, the rifle went off and the coyotes all scattered... except for one.

              I have no doubt that his story was true. It took us an hour to warm him up enough to talk. I mounted that coyote for him as a remembrance. About a three inch circle of silver chest fur was burned off where the bullet entered the lower part of his chest. The bullet had exited the spine right behind the shoulders. I have never since seen a shot like that and doubt I ever will again. I also have no doubt that if he had died there like he should have, there wouldn't have been much left of him by the time we found him. I know that had not the coyotes found him quickly, he would have been dead by the time I found him. Some 45 years later, he is still going strong but keeps his coyote mount as a reminder of humility.

              Comment


              • #8
                Buckshot , yes I heard a very similar story about aggressive coyotes in central Maine. My father in law is the President of a big construction company out of Pittsfield Maine, he had one of his fellow co workers tell him a group of coyotes follow him dragging a whitetail buck out of the woods. They were very aggressive and as darkness fell he said he became concerned that they might attack him but having a rifle he felt in control. A cousin of my father in law from northern Maine is a potato bug biologist and avid outdoorsman said he has heard similar stories.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Never heard of one standing on it's hind legs, but years ago, when I lived on the ranch, we had a problem with dumped dogs. There was a dead end road down one of our pastures, and people would dump their unwanted dogs there. They eventually formed a pack, mostly shepherds, with an occasional Doberman or bulldog. I am sure some of those dogs later crossed with coyotes.
                  The neighbors and I, all started shooting dogs that were not known to us, or that were running in a pack, on sight. I carried a .30-30, 12 gauge double with #4 buckshot, and a long barreled .357 Magnum in my truck when making my feeding rounds, and killed a lot of dogs that winter.
                  The only really aggressive behavior I personally encountered was when a pack had a heifer, (that was trying to calve) cornered on a feed ground. When I drove up, most of the pack ran. They had learned that pickups meant loud noise and death. Three of the largest dogs continued to try to get behind the weakening, wobbly heifer, to hamstring her. She actually had back legs sticking out of her, and was fading fast.
                  I got out with my .30-30, and shot one dog, and one turned toward me, while another continued to circle the heifer. I got a clear shot at the dog on the heifer, and downed him, but when I looked up, the last dog was coming for me, and close. I jacked the rifle and pulled off a lucky shot, hitting the last dog in the shoulder, knocking him down, but not killing him. I then shot him in the head, he was about twenty feet away from where I had stepped out of the truck to start shooting.
                  What with all the noise and commotion, my calving heifer left into the timber, and most of the cattle in that pasture would not come onto the feed ground.
                  I loaded the dead dogs, hauled them to a deep gully and pitched them in, and went back to feed. I eventually got most of the cows to come in to the far side of the feed ground, but didn't get the calving heifer.
                  I saved some feed out of the last sack, and went into the timber looking for my heifer. After searching for nearly an hour, I found her. She was down, trying to calve, but having a hard time. Went back to the truck, got my pulling chain and handle, and eventually she gave birth. Mother and calf were doing fine the next time I fed that pasture, but she was very leery of coming onto that piece of ground for the rest of the winter.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    We have ID-10-T 'yote hunters that run the section lines with their scent dogs and greyhounds!
                    I've warned them several times to keep their dogs off my place but it doesn't seem to faze them.
                    They drive the roads, shooting .22's out their window to spook 'yotes.
                    I've called the sheriffs office numerous times but it does no good. They just come back the next day.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have heard of it in NJ but never seen it. Only yotes I've seen here have been solo.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I've never heard of a coyote being aggressive. I've only ever seen loners and they take off at the sight of a human because they know bullets are about to begin flyin. I've heard many stories of aggressive wild dogs or coy-dogs though, especially towards livestock.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Pmacc60 View Post
                          Buckshot , yes I heard a very similar story about aggressive coyotes in central Maine. My father in law is the President of a big construction company out of Pittsfield Maine, he had one of his fellow co workers tell him a group of coyotes follow him dragging a whitetail buck out of the woods. They were very aggressive and as darkness fell he said he became concerned that they might attack him but having a rifle he felt in control. A cousin of my father in law from northern Maine is a potato bug biologist and avid outdoorsman said he has heard similar stories.
                          Thanks for sharing! Did he happen to say if they stood up while being aggressive?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by FirstBubba View Post
                            We have ID-10-T 'yote hunters that run the section lines with their scent dogs and greyhounds!
                            I've warned them several times to keep their dogs off my place but it doesn't seem to faze them.
                            They drive the roads, shooting .22's out their window to spook 'yotes.
                            I've called the sheriffs office numerous times but it does no good. They just come back the next day.
                            We had grayhounds when I was young. Dog had 10 pups. There was not a coyote within 50 miles. They would kill any they say, and they could run faster than the coyotes. We used to take them for a run along side the car on the back road - they were running about 45 MPH for a few miles.

                            Comment

                            Welcome!

                            Collapse

                            Welcome to Field and Streams's Answers section. Here you will find hunting, fishing, and survival tips from the editors of Field and Stream, as well as recommendations from readers like yourself.

                            If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ for information on posting and navigating the forums.

                            And don't forget to check out the latest reviews on guns and outdoor gear on fieldandstream.com.

                            Right Rail 1

                            Collapse

                            Top Active Users

                            Collapse

                            There are no top active users.

                            Right Rail 2

                            Collapse

                            Latest Topics

                            Collapse

                            Right Rail 3

                            Collapse

                            Footer Ad

                            Collapse
                            Working...
                            X