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If you need to pack light and are limited on weight, what are the necessary supplies you carry for your first-aid kit?

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  • rudyglove27
    replied
    Bandage, rubbing alcohol and flare gun.

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  • Doug Hesson
    replied
    In EMT class,one of the tips we were given was that sugar also helps to stop bleeding.If direct pressure and elevation isn't working on stopping the serious bleeding,sprinkle sugar on the wound until it glazes over.
    As has been suggested,a good first aid kit is worth any weight penalty but learn to use it before you have to.Take a Basic First Aid/CPR class before the hunt.
    You might never need it but that's better than needing to know it and not having a clue about what to do next.

    Leave a comment:


  • aadstowe
    replied
    there are a lot of good answers up there, as an EMT use your head, get a first aid refrance book, READ IT, then make your kit, i would include duct tape due to its water proofness, but a lot of the kits that you can buy are good kits just know that if your going alone use your head.

    Leave a comment:


  • rudyglove27
    replied
    Bandages, neosporin, scissors, white cloth and white tape!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Jet1966
    replied
    A lot of what you need is dependent on just where you go in the pursuit of your outdoor experience. How far are you from emergency help? Basic stuff like rolled gauze, ace bandage, gauze pads, duct tape, etc. are all needed. I noticed that someone above indicated a concern about Quikclot having an expiration date.
    I have had some experience with Quikclot and simply would not go into the outdoors without it. A small cut can turn into a tragedy if you are far from help. 4 x 4's and pressure can deal with a number of issues, but a bleed that can't be controlled can be life-threatening. My experience was with a friend on a hike who fell and gashed his leg. I believe that, if I didn't have Quikclot, he could have lost his leg or even died. I was able to put several Quikclot Sport pads on the wound and applied pressure for several minutes and the bleeding stopped. I had already tried using conventional gauze pads and holding pressure for quite some time to no avail. The Quikclot gauze has something in it that causes the blood to clot. It worked perfectly with the situation we were in.

    On other occasions in the Canadian bush, I have seen really severe injuries that required extraordinary measures to handle including an ax wound through a guy's foot. Quikclot would have made those issues less of problem.

    I strongly suggest that you include several Quikclot packages in your kit. It is very light, compact and could save a life.

    Leave a comment:


  • gdmtnbkr
    replied
    second line should read 4x4's and gauze (roller bandages)

    Leave a comment:


  • gdmtnbkr
    replied
    For immediate life threatening injuries (that you can fix on your self) you will have to stop bleeding so if you can get your hands on some 4x4's and that would be great. The would should be cleaned, sterile water is used in the hospital to irrigate wounds, this will reduce risk of infection. If you are impaled by something (ie branch, arrow etc, DO NOT REMOVE IT, bandage around to hold in place and get to and ER. The object may be next to a blood vessel and removing would cause excessive bleeding. Knowing CPR and first is beneficial to any outdoors man. Being a paramedic I suggest taking a formal class but these are two instances that I could think of where having water and bandages can make a difference outcome.

    Leave a comment:


  • Brian Phipps
    replied
    I might have missed it in someone elses answer but i never saw anything for diarehea such as immodium. its not only annoying to be going contantly but its also a way to become dehydrated quikly

    Leave a comment:


  • crowdpleaser73
    replied
    Three things i have in every aid pack i take with me hunting,fishing or even while i've been deployed overseas. Superglue or liquid skin for small cuts, hydrogen peroxide gel,and mole skin for blisters. Of course you always want to have tape and gauze. Quick clot is realy cool stuff but it has an expiration date. I'd recomend israli bandage (its a realy cool ace bandage with gauze atached) and somthing to make a toriquite with. Im no doctor so i hope this helped ya.

    Leave a comment:


  • GregoryS
    replied
    for hunting and most outdoor activities i carry an extractor for snake bits and stings. guaze, alcohol pads, dr tichiner mouth wash is the best rubbing alcohol. bandaids, mouth resesitation cover, a firstaid book. and a few other wraps. bottle of advil, uses are if a victim is having a heart attack, the advil will thin the blood increasing the chance for survival. tylonol for pain. ibeuprofin for swelling. latex gloves, triple antibiotic. thats about it.

    Leave a comment:


  • TonyK
    replied
    Duct tape. It will serve many purposes.

    Leave a comment:


  • JARED WELLS
    replied
    6 adhesive bandages,2 sterile gauze pads,3-by-3-inch,1smallroll of adhesive tape, 1 moleskin 3-by6-inch,1 small bar of soap, 1small tube of antiseptic,1 pair of scissors, 1 pair of latex gloves, 1 mouth-barrier device for rescue breathing or CPR, 1 plastic goggles or other eye protection , and 1 pencil and paper each

    Leave a comment:


  • matouse3
    replied
    Absolute necessity: Gauze and Tape - you can fabricate just about any size temporary bandage with that. Some triple antibiotic is also high on the list. Sticks can function as temp. splits with the tape.

    Leave a comment:


  • Myxinikela
    replied
    Some seem to be getting off the topic of this post. Over 50 years in the woods I have never needed more than some bandaids, a small bottle of betadine, a few 4x4 gauze sponges, a small folded piece of duct tape, a jackknife, and a needle.

    Needle for splinters. Duct tape for butterflys, to
    hold sponges on injury, cover blisters, etc and betadine for disinfection replace earlier less effective components. Any more than this is wishful thinking and wastes space.

    Leave a comment:


  • t_holinka
    replied
    the most important thing you can have in your first aid bag is knowledge. You can do alot of things with nothing, but the stuff around you. Spint broken bones, cover wounds, and stabilize injuries with the woods you are in. Knowledge is power.

    Leave a comment:

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