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Who is the greatest warrior you have known?

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  • Who is the greatest warrior you have known?

    Who is the greatest warrior you have known?

  • #2
    We all have "favorite", my favorite was my dad. USMC in WW II. One of those fortunate few who never left U.S. soil.
    The greatest "Warrior" I've ever known is my paternal grandfather. Served in France, May 1918 to Nov 1918. He spoke seldom of his experience, though I found out after his death of stories he told others and that he survived a "mustard" gas attack.
    Another of my little known "Warriors" was a family friend, Woodrow W..
    He was a quiet, unassuming man who taught Sunday School class. His obit revealed he had a Bronze Star. I NEVER heard him speak of his military service!

    Who are your heros?

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    • #3
      I never was able to know him but my Uncle survived Pearl Harbor. He was taken prisoner on Corigidor. He survived the Bataan Death march. He was either killed or starved to death in the Japaneese Catawan Prison camp. Since the first day I entered the military he has always been my hero and will always be my greatest warrior. His official date of death is listed as Oct. 1944. My Mother died 5 years ago at the age of 89 and he was her closest brother. Every time his name was mentioned she would cry even up until the day she died. One of my most cherished treasures is the letter from General MacAuthur to my Grandmother informing her of my Uncle's death, and the citation from President Truman. I know that there are probably greater warriors but to me there are none greater.

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      • #4
        I had the honor to know my brother Marine, Capt. Brent Morel, before he was killed charging into an insurgent ambush with his recon platoon near Fallujah, Iraq on April 7, 2004. He earned a Navy Cross with his heroism. His actions saved the lives of his Marines.

        I have had the privelege to know Marines who survived the Chosin Reservoir campaign, and a history teacher at my high school was an infantry Marine on Pelelieu and Okinawa. My 8th grade history teacher was a sailor in WWII who manned the AA guns on a Navy ship and knew all the nicknames for the Japanese aircraft "Zekes" and "Betties," etc. I've had the honor to know and serve in combat with lots of warriors who typified American grit and heroism.

        My 1st SGT in Iraq, First Sergeant Hoover, was wounded by an RPG on patrol one night but came back all patched up and served out the rest of his tour, always serving by example. Semper Fi.

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        • #5
          I knew some good old boys back at work many years ago who were veterans of World War Two.
          One of them was a Navy gunner in the Pacific, and he survived a Kamakaze attack on his ship when he was blown into the sea by the explosion just below his battle station.
          Another was a POW of the Germans. He said he was more scared by allied bombing than anything the Germans might do to him.
          A good friend of mine was killed in Korea when he stepped on a land mine during his second tour of duty there. He had volunteered for that.

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          • #6
            Dad was a surgical tech during WWII in the South Pacific. He virtually never talked of his experiences and I can understand why. Once my younger brother brought home a hamster someone gave him. Dad went absolutely ballistic! Insanely upset. After he cooled down, Dad patiently explained to us two older boys how on the wards of evac hospitals the rats would come in at night and eat the fingers and toes off patients, particularly badly burned victims. Dad was hit in the face with shrapnel from a booby-trapped bridge on Guadalcanal after the island was "taken." Insurgents were roaming the jungles for years afterwards. He pulled three patients from the convoy out of the river but all were dead. He was going back for more when a captain stopped him and informed him he was hit. Dad never got his Purple Heart. He felt that because he wasn't wounded in combat he wasn't entitled to Purple Heart. I did get his other medals shortly before he died but still don't have the Purple Heart. I need to get his medical records. Should do that. They sent a Bronze Star but Dad sent it back. He didn't feel he should have received one. Since his (and almost everyone else from that era) records burned in a Kansas City fire in 1957, no one seemed to know why a Bronze Star was sent. It now appears a blanket award was made to the entire unit. That apparently is a rare occurrence.

            The other inspirational warrior I know is my dog Pearl. She has been through hell in the seven years of her life and carries each disaster cheerily and with courage. Her wonderful attitude and example has carried me through the darkest times imaginable. She is the definition of inspiration.

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            • #7
              As I read the above posts, it brings to mind a story a one time "landlord" told me.
              He didn't say if it was "Midway" or not, but his ship was hit by a "kamikaze" pilot. Thankfully, it was a dud! Jack said the pilot sat dead in his plane but had a brightly colored scarf around his neck. He jumped from his "station", knife in hand to cut off a piece of the scarf. As he reached for the scarf, an officer pulled his side arm and told Jack he would kill him if he touched the scarf. Jack found out later that the Japanese would "boobie trap" their scarf to the bomb.

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              • #8
                My greatest warrior was my dad. Served both in the Army Air Force & Airforce 1941-1952. Staff Sergent. Decorated with 2 Silver Stars,Broze Star, 2 Purple Hearts,Medal of Valor, Campain Ribbons from The Europian Theater and Okanowa, hash marks completely down his sleave. Followed by my Uncle Jr who surived Auschwitz. My dad's company reliberated the camp but my dad never saw his brother. My uncled pasted away May25th followed by their sister who was a Wac on Aug 15th and then my dad Oct 27th all of 2011.... Uncle was 87, Dad was 85 & Aunt was 84 .God rest their souls

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                • #9
                  Speaking of scarves, I just remembered another good old boy who was a co-pilot on a B-17 in Europe during World War Two.
                  He said that one time when they were returning from a bombing raid, they had dropped their payload and expended all of their ammunition when he looked out the side window and saw a German Luftwaffe pilot flying alongside them, parallel to their course.
                  He must have been out of ammo also because he did not attack and fire on them. When my friend made eye contact with the German pilot, he noticed that he was wearing a white scarf around his neck. The German pilot waved and veered away to return to his base.

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                  • #10
                    My Great-Uncle (Grandpa's half brother) was a tanker in Korea. The lead tank got hit and was burning, so he exited his and went to pull out survivors when the enemy charged. He was stabbed in the back with a bayonet, only to turn around and stick a knife into the North Korean, who in turn dropped his rifle and ran. Fortunate it was just a flesh wound. After he was in Korea, he never ate rice or Chinese food because he said his hatred for the people that stuck him. I'm sure he saw many more terrible things.

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                    • #11
                      My grandfather who I mentioned in a recent post. US Army AF WWII, 65 combat missions flown. Received the Air Medal with 11 oak leaf clusters, entitled to wear campaign ribbons from European, African, and Middle Eastern Theaters and to wear battle and campaign ribbons from Germany, Northern France, Europe, Air Offensive, and Normandy. Also a close family friend who served in the USMC in Vietnam. He has struggled tremendously mentally, and physically since returning home, but never lost his sense of humor or gave up on trying to get back to "normal." He is currently suffering numerous health problems and looks many, many years older than his true age. Doctors are yet to pinpoint exactly what is causing his problems, but suspect it was exposure to Agent Orange or other chemical agents during his service.

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                      • #12
                        My grandfather will always be my greatest and most respected warrior. He was a WWII veteran, but he was also a warrior in life. Survived a stroke, and cancer, and beat the odds the whole way through. He was a real man, and showed a true warrior spirit.

                        One of my Staff Sergeants was also someone I looked up to during my time in the Marines. Didn't talk much about Fallujah, except for tactics that would save our lives. I heard from other people though he was a true warrior in the first degree. He came up with an idea in Fallujah to create shape charges out of water, C4, and a plastic garbage bag.

                        He and his fireteam would "roof hop" until they were told they were on top if a building with some insurgents. They would then fill the bags with water, and place some C4 underneath. After the detonation, a nice man sized hole would be left for them to jump down into so they could spread some good old hate and discontent to the enemy.

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                        • #13
                          And my Great Uncle who was in Vietnam for 3 tours. Staff Sargent by the end of his career. Coolest, calmest man I knew. He passed in 2004 I believe, bone cancer they say may have been caused by Agent Orange. He never would talk about it to us kids, but told a few people of what he saw. He had nightmares almost every night until his death. He was also the rifle coach for Ohio State for awhile, good friends with Woody Hayes.

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                          • #14
                            My Father-in-law also was a prisoner of war in a German POW camp for 9 months. He went in weighing 198 pounds and came out weighing 118 pounds. The only thing that they had to eat was turnip juice and occasionally the turnip would be in the juice. Needless to say he would never allow one in the house. He was wounded once trying to escape surprising he wasn't killed. I knew many of my fellow buddies in Vietnam who were warriors but at the time our service here at home didn't mean much.

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                            • #15
                              Captain (Col.)Robert Howard, CMOH recipient nominated three times. Best leader and warrior I have ever know. RIP

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