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  • Cold Feet ?

    The best I have found is 'Heat Holders" About $25 to $30 depending on style / weight. Note: they wear good if you keep your nails trimmed. I also use several 'Artic Shield' accessproies. Heat Holders can be ordered direct or I think tractor Supply has them.
    I started hunting before thinslate and gore-tex. We relied on cotton and felt a lot and the weave of 'thermal underwear'. When hot seats first came out we stood on them to keep the feet insulated. Things have come a long way.
    Any other products that you can mention ? I also found Heat Holders' in a very large True Value Hardware (like hardware stores used to be) store in a small town.
    The old adage, keep the hands (use a muffler), feet and head warm and you can hunt all day.

  • #2
    I've been satisfied with the cheapie, stick-on toe warmers you can get for a buck or two. Can't find one right now to get the brand name. I wear a pair of thin wool socks and a pair of medium to heavy ones, with the warmer stuck in between. They mold to the curve of your toes pretty good -- no uncomfortable lumps, if you get it positioned right. These are not the kind you shake up; they generate heat as soon as you peel them open.

    Those disposable shake-up handwarmers, not so much. Sometimes I get one that puts out good heat, but rarely. If my gloves aren't doing the job, my hand-warming device is my armpit.
    However, the wrapper of those disposable handwarmers does burn very well. Use it for tinder to start a campfire and you'll have nice warm hands in no time!

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by PigHunter
      Most of the time it's not that cold in Alabama. When it's below freezing, I'll use Danner boots with 400g of insulation and wool socks. When it's above freezing, I wear uninsulated boots and cotton socks.

      Danner - Pronghorn Realtree Edge 400G

      If wanting more warmth when in a blind, I'll use boot blankets. Can always put a packet of disposable handwarmers in each.

      Amazon.com : ArcticShield Men's Boot Insulator : Sports & Outdoors

      I'll also use a synthetic camo blanket across my legs when sitting in a cold blind. It's amazing how that helps by blocking direct wind on my legs and feet.

      For hands I'm usually wearing fingerless camo gloves. I'll either keep my gloved hands in pockets or under the blanket. I've got a camo muff but like the boot blankets, rarely use it.

      If the temp drops below 20 degF, just forget it. I'm not going hunting unless planning to either stay on the move or carry a small heater into the stand.
      A couple things - Artic Shield makes over boot booties. Excellent sitting in blind in 10 deg or less. Can walk a little but has light sole.
      My muffler has a Jon-E in it if it is down around 10 or 0. Then hands are bare for handling firearm or bow. I also have a wool face or my snowmobile insulated mask. A camo Army surplus scarf tops it off under my Filson vest and Filson Double Mackanaw Parka.
      There is a Mr. Heat charcoal heater made in Detroit that also has extra large cut parkas that look like a tent that you bring in for max warmth. Any scent is carried directly up and out and carried further on the thermals. Very very popular in upper Michigan. Here I am using it
      in the open. Keeps the guys warm. I carry a dozen bricks in a plastic bag for all day hunting. triple wall with cover I carry it in the basket of my atv. Just tap it and it kicks up the heat level. No fumes at all. Sold by sportsman Guide.

      Click image for larger version

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      All that stuff and one ML season in Jan I was hunting in a T-shirt.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
        The best I have found is 'Heat Holders" About $25 to $30 depending on style / weight. Note: they wear good if you keep your nails trimmed. I also use several 'Artic Shield' accessproies. Heat Holders can be ordered direct or I think tractor Supply has them.
        I started hunting before thinslate and gore-tex. We relied on cotton and felt a lot and the weave of 'thermal underwear'. When hot seats first came out we stood on them to keep the feet insulated. Things have come a long way.
        Any other products that you can mention ? I also found Heat Holders' in a very large True Value Hardware (like hardware stores used to be) store in a small town.
        The old adage, keep the hands (use a muffler), feet and head warm and you can hunt all day.
        Opening day I walk 2 miles to my tree in sweat pants T-shirt and sneakers with cotton socks. I have a summit viper treestand on my back with a backpack full of warm clothes , boots and a towel. When I get to my tree I strip, then dry any sweat off with towel. I then get dressed with a few layers and climb tree. I've done this in 50 degree weather and 9 degrees.
        I don't get all that sweaty and can sit without getting cold.


        I'm camping in my work van again . When I get back to my van after all day hunt at 8 pm I'll fire up the stove and buddy heater.
        My opening day meal will be Hoffman hotdog and coney , baked beans and blueberries. I'm going to read The hills of Truxton until I fall asleep .

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by MattM37 View Post
          I've been satisfied with the cheapie, stick-on toe warmers you can get for a buck or two. Can't find one right now to get the brand name. I wear a pair of thin wool socks and a pair of medium to heavy ones, with the warmer stuck in between. They mold to the curve of your toes pretty good -- no uncomfortable lumps, if you get it positioned right. These are not the kind you shake up; they generate heat as soon as you peel them open.

          Those disposable shake-up handwarmers, not so much. Sometimes I get one that puts out good heat, but rarely. If my gloves aren't doing the job, my hand-warming device is my armpit.
          However, the wrapper of those disposable handwarmers does burn very well. Use it for tinder to start a campfire and you'll have nice warm hands in no time!
          Did you end up replacing your Muck Boots yet and if so what did you go with?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Danbo View Post

            Opening day I walk 2 miles to my tree in sweat pants T-shirt and sneakers with cotton socks. I have a summit viper treestand on my back with a backpack full of warm clothes , boots and a towel. When I get to my tree I strip, then dry any sweat off with towel. I then get dressed with a few layers and climb tree. I've done this in 50 degree weather and 9 degrees.
            I don't get all that sweaty and can sit without getting cold.


            I'm camping in my work van again . When I get back to my van after all day hunt at 8 pm I'll fire up the stove and buddy heater.
            My opening day meal will be Hoffman hotdog and coney , baked beans and blueberries. I'm going to read The hills of Truxton until I fall asleep .
            I use the large Mr Buddy in camp unless I get soaked, then I turn on the kerosene heat.

            Propane puts moisture into the air - clothes will take forever to dry. Kero and wood heat take the moisture from the air. Try it you will be surprises. If you know how to operate your kero heater there is very little odor and any there is leaves the clothes as soon as you go out. Been using kero and wood for years. I learned about propane in my vanI built up for hunting - clothes never dried with propane. One of the best Kero heat is the Aladdin 'Blue Flame'. Popular around the World.

            Comment


            • #7
              I haven’t had real cold feet in years, mostly do to dry insulated boots that fit right with a decent wool sock. For gloves I wear a pair of fingerless fleece Simms that I bought for fly fishing in Alaska back in ‘08. I’m not much on sitting long in real cold weather either, I’ll get up and walk a bit much like Matt mentioned. I generally don’t bother with the chemical warmers although I have used some while ice fishing that I got as gifts.

              I bought the Kid a Cabela’s hand muffler for Christmas a few years back, he’s gotten a little better but his hands used to get wicked clammy and cold. Figured it was a teenage hormone thing. He wasn’t expecting it and it’s been one of the best surprise gifts I’ve come up with, he still uses it regularly. With hand warmers when it’s real cold out.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post

                I use the large Mr Buddy in camp unless I get soaked, then I turn on the kerosene heat.

                Propane puts moisture into the air - clothes will take forever to dry. Kero and wood heat take the moisture from the air. Try it you will be surprises. If you know how to operate your kero heater there is very little odor and any there is leaves the clothes as soon as you go out. Been using kero and wood for years. I learned about propane in my vanI built up for hunting - clothes never dried with propane. One of the best Kero heat is the Aladdin 'Blue Flame'. Popular around the World.
                Not my first rodeo. I'm there to hunt not vacation. If I needed all these creature comforts I'd stay in a hotel.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by fitch270 View Post
                  I haven’t had real cold feet in years, mostly do to dry insulated boots that fit right with a decent wool sock. For gloves I wear a pair of fingerless fleece Simms that I bought for fly fishing in Alaska back in ‘08. I’m not much on sitting long in real cold weather either, I’ll get up and walk a bit much like Matt mentioned. I generally don’t bother with the chemical warmers although I have used some while ice fishing that I got as gifts.

                  I bought the Kid a Cabela’s hand muffler for Christmas a few years back, he’s gotten a little better but his hands used to get wicked clammy and cold. Figured it was a teenage hormone thing. He wasn’t expecting it and it’s been one of the best surprise gifts I’ve come up with, he still uses it regularly. With hand warmers when it’s real cold out.
                  I use the small Jon-E in the muffler and leave my gloves in there but still keep my hands bare.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post

                    I use the small Jon-E in the muffler and leave my gloves in there but still keep my hands bare.
                    I wouldn’t be surprised if the Kid doesn’t know what one of those is, and I have one in the tool chest I keep gear in. I’m not even sure where I got it from but it’s old school enough I keep it around.

                    I bought a big bottle of lighter fluid this past summer for cleaning triggers, might have to try the warmer out just for kicks. Especially if my daughter wants to go when it’s cold out.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by fitch270 View Post

                      Did you end up replacing your Muck Boots yet and if so what did you go with?
                      Ahem. (What's the little emoji that indicates embarrassment?) I had already bought new Mucks, actually, when I posted that question. I hadn't heard about the change. Then, when I did hear about it from a guy at work, I posted here to see if anybody had any actual experience -- hoping, of course, to hear something like, "Yeah, they're maybe not quite so great, but still a good boot!" No such luck. I haven't worn them yet, though, and might return them. Looks like this weekend and next week aren't going to be too cold and sloppy so I'd probably be going with my old Cabelas Iron Ridge boots for the time being anyway.

                      There's a great men's clothing and shoe store not too far away, and I know they carry the Dry Shods. Probably I'll return the Mucks and head that way before the real winter sets in.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by MattM37 View Post

                        Ahem. (What's the little emoji that indicates embarrassment?) I had already bought new Mucks, actually, when I posted that question. I hadn't heard about the change. Then, when I did hear about it from a guy at work, I posted here to see if anybody had any actual experience -- hoping, of course, to hear something like, "Yeah, they're maybe not quite so great, but still a good boot!" No such luck. I haven't worn them yet, though, and might return them. Looks like this weekend and next week aren't going to be too cold and sloppy so I'd probably be going with my old Cabelas Iron Ridge boots for the time being anyway.

                        There's a great men's clothing and shoe store not too far away, and I know they carry the Dry Shods. Probably I'll return the Mucks and head that way before the real winter sets in.
                        I tried on a pair of mucks once and found I could not tuck my pant legs into the boots. Foot size was good, just too narrow at the top. I think I have a normal size calf.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post

                          I tried on a pair of mucks once and found I could not tuck my pant legs into the boots. Foot size was good, just too narrow at the top. I think I have a normal size calf.
                          That was actually something I liked a lot, with my old Mucks. I could always get my pant legs in there comfortably and then that tight ring at the top was good tick protection. Sometimes, when stream-fishing, I'd even cross a crick a little bit above the boots and while my pants would get wet, no water would get inside the boot, as long as I moved fast enough across. (Later, the seepage from the pant leg would be inside the boot, but no big deal if I had thick wool socks on.)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Danbo View Post

                            Opening day I walk 2 miles to my tree in sweat pants T-shirt and sneakers with cotton socks. I have a summit viper treestand on my back with a backpack full of warm clothes , boots and a towel. When I get to my tree I strip, then dry any sweat off with towel. I then get dressed with a few layers and climb tree. I've done this in 50 degree weather and 9 degrees.
                            I don't get all that sweaty and can sit without getting cold.


                            I'm camping in my work van again . When I get back to my van after all day hunt at 8 pm I'll fire up the stove and buddy heater.
                            My opening day meal will be Hoffman hotdog and coney , baked beans and blueberries. I'm going to read The hills of Truxton until I fall asleep .
                            Looks like our forecast for this weekend isn't bad at all. Good luck, hope you get one.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Merino wool socks. Don’t remember the brand. I also wear a neck gaiter not
                              on of those gaiters with a hood just a neck gaiter. I use a neck gator and carhartt brand beanie cap best combo I’ve found you can adjust it to have two layers over your ears or open it up. The gator also acts as a face mask. I’ve been know to take a piece of thick cardboard to put under my feet. Also carry a muffler if it’s below 20. I invested in the under armor cold gear the heavy 3:0 I think worth the money. I’ve noticed the last couple of years my feet get colder faster than they used to I’m going to invest in a new pair of lacrosse boots before next year. And will take hot hand sometimes. As far as gloves I use only light weight gloves carry a heavy pair in the pack for emergencies. And have taken a my old poncho liner sometimes. Thinking of investing in a good wool blanket to take to the stand.

                              Comment

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