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Bi/Tri -pods

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  • Bi/Tri -pods

    I've seen bipods on hunting rifles, but always considered them nonessential and cumbersome ... until I started building AR's.
    A bipod, to me, just adds a touch of class/sass to an AR.

    Then, I realized I could set my rifle down safely without laying it in the grass or dirt or leaning it against a tree, fence post or other object.

    Now I'm in the process, slowly but surely, of adding a bipod to all my rifles. Even my inline muzzle loader.

    How many of you utilize bipods?

  • #2
    I use bi-pods of all kinds, and I use them so much of the time.
    Uses?

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    • #3
      I need to build a box blind and I've got all the framing material. I've just got to come up with some siding.

      When I build a box blind, I build it wide enough to be comfy for 2 people. Tall enough to stand up and a shooting bench across the front.

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      • #4
        You’re building that shooting table, make sure you have enough length for your bipod to be stable, and for a rear bag to get support for the buttstock.
        once it is built, you might try your rear bag and make sure it gives you enough vertical adjustment for all the different shooting locations you have

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        • #5
          Originally posted by PigHunter

          Will it have stairs?

          Uhhmmm.....?
          No sir, I don't get no lower than 'taters nor higher than corn! 🤠!

          Jesus was a carpenter, I'm just a wood butcher! LOL!

          I try to set my blind so the floor is about 28 to 32 inches off the ground.
          I just want to be able to see up over the weeds.

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          • #6
            Click image for larger version

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            The shooting window is framed out inside with 2x6’s the same as the other. I have a couple small closed cell foam pads to set on the shelf for a rest. Shots aren’t far, longest might be 100 yards if one crosses low.

            We added hooks inside yesterday for accessories and such. Should be good to go.

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            • #7
              If snow wasn't a problem, you could hang about a 12" shelf just under the window.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by FirstBubba View Post
                If snow wasn't a problem, you could hang about a 12" shelf just under the window.
                The interior is deep enough I could set up a small table or even a tripod inside. I don’t really think we’ll need one but it might help from getting busted from the gun sticking out. I’d prefer to have muzzle blast outside as much as possible however, even with muffs on.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by fitch270 View Post

                  The interior is deep enough I could set up a small table or even a tripod inside. I don’t really think we’ll need one but it might help from getting busted from the gun sticking out. I’d prefer to have muzzle blast outside as much as possible however, even with muffs on.
                  Yes sir. I always set up my box blinds so that the muzzle stays outside.
                  I make shooting bags and set my rifle on the bags pointed in the general direction I expect deer to appear. Yeppers, I've been very surprised at times! LOL!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by PigHunter
                    I only attach a bipod for sight-in and load development at the range. And that's relatively new for me. Previously I've just used sandbags. The bipod will be removed prior to leaving the range.

                    Not going to use a bipod in the field. That's just something else to catch on brush. In a pop-up I may use shooting sticks. In a box blind I plan to carry a small sandbag to place on the windowsill.

                    I don't have a problem leaning a rifle against a tree or brush as long as it's secure from falling. Sometimes I use my hands to break a fork on a nearby bush in order to make a gun holder. Also, I don't have any qualms about laying it on dry ground. If I still owned an AR, it would be placed with the ejection port up.

                    When I'm leaning against a tree or otherwise standing, I will at times prop the muzzle on the toe of my boot to keep dirt out. But those muzzle condoms work well too.

                    Amazon.com : Rifle Condom Style Muzzle Cover, Rubber Muzzle Cap, Pack of 20 (Black) : Sports & Outdoors

                    Now I'm afraid pig is going to tell me those AR condoms do double duty as regular condoms, snug fit and not too long. LOL.

                    Comment

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