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Whatzit in Montana

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  • Whatzit in Montana

    Found this in a field when I was pheasant hunting last week. A very rare find, especially one this size that is nearly intact. Anyone guess what it is?

  • #2
    A manure spreader.

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    • #3
      Looks like for inspecting telegraph line.

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      • #4
        Potato harvester.

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        • #5
          Late model "road grader". Probably used to build terraces.
          Being all metal, this one could possibly have been pulled by a tractor, but that would have required a 2 man crew.
          I've also heard them referred to as a "land plane".

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          • #6
            Originally posted by FirstBubba View Post
            Late model "road grader". Probably used to build terraces.
            Being all metal, this one could possibly have been pulled by a tractor, but that would have required a 2 man crew.
            I've also heard them referred to as a "land plane".
            I thought about cutting out the brand name on the side of it. Instead figured I'd give someone with some research skills a chance. Yes, it is a road grader. I have seen other ones that were horse powered (e.g. the grader at the Schaefer Meadows airstrip in Montana's Great Bear Wilderness) but never one this small. If it was truly horse driven I would think it would have at least one wheel in the front but maybe not needed given its small size. Actually, something like this would probably be worked with oxen as they had more power and could work rough or wet ground better. With its raised tongue I suppose this thing could be turned on a dime whereas the four or three wheeled variations would be less manoeuvrable (they would have steering wheels). The same field also contains the remnants of a very old Chev truck, I'm guessing about 1917. The cab is all there in one piece which is rather remarkable. No one has shot it full of holes ... yet. Beautiful pheasant hunting ground but no birds. Puppy finally did put up one rooster on the opposite end of the very large property just before dark. Wind was blowing 30 mph but I still got him. I bet we put in ten miles that day.

            The two "wheels" on top are actually cranks, one for raising and lowering the blade (only about five feet long and maybe a foot and a half high) and the other crank changes the angle.
            Last edited by Ontario Honker Hunter; 11-27-2019, 08:44 PM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Ontario Honker Hunter View Post

              I thought about cutting out the brand name on the side of it. Instead figured I'd give someone with some research skills a chance. Yes, it is a road grader. I have seen other ones that were horse powered (e.g. the grader at the Schaefer Meadows airstrip in Montana's Great Bear Wilderness) but never one this small. If it was truly horse driven I would think it would have at least one wheel in the front but maybe not needed given its small size. Actually, something like this would probably be worked with oxen as they had more power and could work rough or wet ground better. With its raised tongue I suppose this thing could be turned on a dime whereas the four or three wheeled variations would be less manoeuvrable (they would have steering wheels). The same field also contains the remnants of a very old Chev truck, I'm guessing about 1917. The cab is all there in one piece which is rather remarkable. No one has shot it full of holes ... yet. Beautiful pheasant hunting ground but no birds. Puppy finally did put up one rooster on the opposite end of the very large property just before dark. Wind was blowing 30 mph but I still got him. I bet we put in ten miles that day.

              The two "wheels" on top are actually cranks, one for raising and lowering the blade (only about five feet long and maybe a foot and a half high) and the other crank changes the angle.
              This area was part of the last (1904) Ok land rush.
              It's STILL absolutely loaded with old, horse drawn equipment and steel wheeled tractors.
              I can show you a 10' grain drill with a wooden (what's left of it!) grain box with about a huge hackberry tree growing up through it.
              Stationary hay balers. I hauled a stationary grain thrasher to the scrap yard. Rusted beyond rebuilding.
              Still lots of tractors around with the old fly wheel.
              Hay rakes, sickle mowers, fresnoes, a sweet potato planter and other hunks of oxidized history that are beyond redemption except for the scrap dealer.

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