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I'm ready to get into flyfishing and I think I can pick a good rod (although I'm not sure about length), but what about the reel

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  • I'm ready to get into flyfishing and I think I can pick a good rod (although I'm not sure about length), but what about the reel

    I'm ready to get into flyfishing and I think I can pick a good rod (although I'm not sure about length), but what about the reels. They all look the same to me. Whats a good reel and good price and do they all have the same features?

  • #2
    Sorry about the avatar, I should have put a fishing pic in there.

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    • #3
      Rod length might depend on the size of the river your in, I use a 9' rod most of the time, except when I steelhead then it's 10'.

      You can get a good reel from Ross. I like the large arbor ones myself. There are plenty to choose from depending on your price range.

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      • #4
        You can't go wrong with a Ross reel- they are the best for the money. I also like the Cabelas SLA reels.
        A nine foot is a good general rod length. Shorter rods work better on brushy streams.

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        • #5
          get a 9 foot 5wt (for trout) (8 wt for largemouth) and yes, an Albright is great rod, as is cabelas gear.
          Orvis has a setup chart, involving 4 price levles, cheap, middle end, high end, build you're own.

          If you need any help, E-mail me at [email protected]

          I sell flys so if you need help talk to me.

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          • #6
            I agree with above. A 9 ft rod in 5-6 weight is a good general purpose rod. They make fast, med and slow action rods. Fast means it bends more at the tip and slow means it will bend down towards the handle. I prefer a fast rod but a slower rod will help protect delicate tippets. I suggest buying a rod at the store as opposed through a catalog. You have to like the feel, the action and the handle prior to dropping big bucks. I have more rods than I can count and regret buying the cheapers one because all they do now is lay aroung my shop. I wish I had went the extra mile years ago and purchased high end and in the long run would have saved money.

            Purchasing a rod at a local fly shop will pay big dividends in the long run. You not only buy a rod but years of good advice.

            There are a lot of good reels on the market. Depending on the type of fishing you do will depend on the reel. The Orvis Battenkill is a decent reel and has a good drag system and not priced out of this world. Ross makes a good reel also.

            Good luck with your fly fishing.

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            • #7
              I agree with Alex on the rods and i really like the Orvis Battenkill Mid Arbor reel. It is a great balance between traditional and large arbor reels. It will only set you back $120

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              • #8
                I really appreciate the answers I received. Here, it is stream, small river fishing for trout.
                But, is it the reel or the rod that is most important to start out flyfishing?

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                • #9
                  Rod.

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                  • #10
                    i would have to agree the orvis battenkill mid arbor reel and they are dependable and not to bad on price look into it

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                    • #11
                      Rod, reels arn't really needed to be nice unless going for a fish that will pull a lot of drag.

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                      • #12
                        Jim- for small river, stream trout fishing i go with a 3 or 4 wt. 8 or 8 1/2' rod, nothing bigger. reels aren't as crucial. something with adequate drag. i don't think you need a large arbor in the situation you describe. i'm a temple fork rod fan (not a paid endorsement), so you might look at them.

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                        • #13
                          9'5wt for rivers and large streams, and 8'4wts for smaller stuff.

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                          • #14
                            if you want a decent setup, an 8 foot to 9 foot rod in a 5/6 wt would be ideal, and for the reel, you have many choices. I recommend for top of the line, a Hardy Perfect size 2, or an Orvis CFO II, but for starters, the Pflueger 1594RC (Rim Control) would be perfect.

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                            • #15
                              A 9 ft rod in 5-6 weight is a good general purpose rod!

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