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did anyone hear ever grind a knife down? dont think you guy/girls are going to know what i mean but if you look at a knife it co

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  • did anyone hear ever grind a knife down? dont think you guy/girls are going to know what i mean but if you look at a knife it co

    did anyone hear ever grind a knife down? dont think you guy/girls are going to know what i mean but if you look at a knife it comes to a sudden point, well the point on my favorite knife is gone so should i try it with a small grinding wheel?

  • #2
    What happened to the blade? Yes, I have done it but only when it was MY fault not the manufactures.
    Other wise send it back and have it repaired.

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    • #3
      You can grind a blade down to reshape the edge and the point. This is not a quick or a casual job; much care has to be taken to keep the heat down as you work. I don't have a slow speed grinder so a use this method and it has worked for me very well for many years. Keep a bucket of water by the grinder. With little pressure on the blade carefully try to restore the shape of the damaged tip. Never let the blade get to the point where it turns blue as this will probably destroy it. Keep grinding lightly and constantly dipping into the bucket. If you see the water start to bubble up on the side of the blade that you can see as you grind, you need to dip the blade. Once you have established a edge and a front point you will have to stop grinding and finish the work with a stone. I prefer the newer diamond stones to sharpen the edge. They take virtually no time and produce a very sharp knife. Good luck to you!

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      • #4
        I shy away from a grindstone unless there is a constant supply of coolant pouring over the knife, or the stone is turning at a very slow speed. I've just used a file and stone to reshape a blade - time consuming.

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        • #5
          Like MLH if I need to reshape a I'll file it. This is typically done if I break a point or really mess up an edge for some reason. If you grind you had better be ready to keep the blade cool...

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          • #6
            yeah thats what happened i wore down the edge

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            • #7
              libertyfirst seems to know his stuff on knives and I agree with his take on this. I have a friend who makes knives as a hobby. When I first met him he told me that the major mistake that people make with a good knife is thinking it always has to be sharpened. Sharpening takes metal off the blade, thus reducing the size of the blade itself and it's life. Most knives that haven't been abused just needs the cutting edge reshaped, having the bevel corrected and stropped.

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              • #8
                Jim in Mo is right on, Very seldom do you need to reestablish the wire on the knifes edge. All that is needed is using a smooth steel with light even strokes. I prefer to use a diamond stone to reestablish the tip of the blade or the wire, which ever needs to be touched up by hand. It takes a long time but you get the edge you want with minimal heat and you don't take off near as much metal as with a grinding wheel. If you use a diamond stone or a wet stone be careful about applying too much pressure, it does not take much to grind metal off of a blade. You can use light swirly strokes in a clock wise turn or you can stroke it like you are using a sharpening steel. apply even pressure over the entire blade and as I am sure you know maintain the same grind degree on both sides.

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                • #9
                  I agree with libertyfirst and MLH; if you intend to use a bench grinder, do NOT hold the blade against the grinder or the heat generated by the friction will ruin the temper of the blade. You can rough-shape the work with a file and complete the job by careful use of a grinder. I'm guessing you've lost a considerable piece off the tip of the blade if this operation is necessary. Consider the shape you want to achieve; sketch it on a piece of paper. Wear safety goggles, and take your time. If you're in a hurry, you may very well ruin the job.

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                  • #10
                    Agreed with libertyfirst and + 1 for you sir!!!

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