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Do you need a machine to spool braid or can I do it by hand?

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  • Do you need a machine to spool braid or can I do it by hand?

    Do you need a machine to spool braid or can I do it by hand?

  • #2
    What type of reel do you actually have?

    Comment


    • #3
      You can do it on your own, but you have to make sure that you spool it under sufficient tension. If you don't, when you have a fish on, the thin line can bit into the line on the spool and lock down the reel until you can clear the mess.

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      • #4
        How much tension are we talking here, can you use your finger? Its a spinning reel by the way.

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        • #5
          Is this the same reel you are hoping to use to bring in a 9 foot shark? If so, you are WAY undergunned! No spinning reel has the drag or the line capacity to handle a fish like that. I use a Penn Senator 4/0 with upgraded drag discs, spooled mostly with 135 lb powerpro and tipped with mono, and I kinda doubt it could beach a 9 footer with any spunk.

          Regardless, to answer your question, you need more tension than you can put on with your finger. What I do is run the line under a good sized book and then tie it to the spool. I put on a heavy leather welding glove (very cheap at Harbor Freight and you should have them for shark fishing anyway) and stand on the book, running the line across the palm of my rod hand while gripping the rod well ahead of the reel. I then slowly reel the line onto the rod. It should be difficult to turn the handle, as if you had a very large fish on.

          Don't try it without the glove, you will be bleeding very quickly.

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          • #6
            I typically just tie a good length off around my big toe and doze off under a straw hat. Then when some pesky bull shark tags in, I roll up my sleeves and give him a good what for....

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            • #7
              The reason that I asked what type of reel you have is that the proper method of spooling on new line for spinning reels is different from reels that work and look like a winch. When you cast a spinning reel, the line gets twisted naturally by the folding action of it coming off the side of a non-rotating spool. Then when you wind the line back on the non-rotating spool with the rotor and bail, you put twists back into the line, but in the opposite direction as when you cast. So in theory, the line ends up without any twists. But remember that you twist the line every time you crank it onto the spool. So when you put new line on the reel by cranking, you need to lay the new spool of line flat on the floor and let it feed off the side of the new spool in the opposite direction as it is going onto the reel spool. This simulates the line as already having been cast because it is feeding off the side of the new spool just like when casting. When you crank the new line on the reel, just a little tension is all you need to help so you can certainly do that with your fingers, but it is best to protect your fingers because braid can burn them.

              Sharks have been caught on every type of fishing gear from fly rods to huge electric winch rigs so it is possible to catch a pretty good size shark with a good size spinning reel. But winch style reels such as the Penn mentioned above are better suited for large fish because they hold more line for letting fish run and have heavier built drag systems to handle the heat from slipping the drag during the long runs.

              Note: I put a 16oz soda bottle full of sand on top of the new line spool to hold it down when laying it on the floor to use for re-spooling. Also I try to get the new line on a spool that is as close to the same diameter as possible to the reel spool because one wrap of line on a spool equals one twist in the line.
























































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              • #8
                i hav found that the easiest way to spool line is with a simple jig I made after seeing a serving gig for archery strings. I welded three pieces of scrap steel that I had together in a u shape and drilled inline holes through the top of both of the uprights and a single hole in the center on the bottom part. then i found a screw that was about 8 in long and 2 wing nuts screw the u into a work bench or heavy peace of wood then thread the long screw through one upright through the spool of line the put on one wing nut the thread through the second up right using the final wing nut to tighten the screw between the 2 uprights. Use the wing nut in between the uprights to control the tension on the spool.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Mike, your rig will certainly work excellent when spooling line on reels where the spool of the reel turns because your are turning the new line spool also. If you take the spool off a spinning reel and turn it to wind the line on, your rig will still work fine there too. But if you wind the line onto a spinning reel by letting the new line spool turn while the spool on the reel does not, you are putting twists into the new line. Starting out with new line which already has twists in it is not the best situation. A spinning reel will naturally get twists in the line every time the drag is slipped, and if you actually crank the reel handle while the drag is slipping, you can multiply the number of twists by the gear ratio of the reel.

                  I have been designing, building, and repairing reels for over forty years, and I have studied the line twist on both spinning reels and spincast reels since I got started. I once built a giant spinning reel using a washing machine tub as the spool. Then I used garden hose with a stripe down the side as the line. With it I demonstrated the line twist of spinning reels and how it worked. I have even built sample reels that do not twist the line. A good friend of mine, Casey Childre has a patent on a twist proof reel. He manufactured them for a while in the eighties as the "Childre Double Clutch Reel" which you can still find sometimes on ebay.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    If I had to have a machine to spool on line, I probably would not do nearly the amount of fishing I do. Watch the line twist as Santa says and go get that line in the water. Note that if you are fishing from a boat, it is common to have to drag your empty line behind the boat to remove twist that occurs from use; especially if you have novices realing in fish.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      You can't just tie it to the spool in the normal way . I did and the whole spool of line kept slipping. I originally thaught that my brake was slipping and no longer working on my spinning reel but it turned out that 150 yards of 20 lbs test braided line was actually slipping giving the impression that my brake was broken.
                      So tie it twice to three times around the spool and then test for slipppage before winding all your line onto your spool.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        You can't just tie it to the spool in the normal way . I did and the whole spool of line kept slipping. I originally thaught that my brake was slipping and no longer working on my spinning reel but it turned out that 150 yards of 20 lbs test braided line was actually slipping giving the impression that my brake was broken.
                        So tie it twice to three times around the spool and then test for slipppage before winding all your line onto your spool.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          If you simply tie it on, the whole spool will slip (as Sailorboy said). I usually put enough 20 lb mono on the spool to cover it, then connect the braid with a blood knot and go from there.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            you can put on thier by hand
                            i've always do it by hand

                            Comment

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