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I need some help. I am beyond terrible at sharpening knives. I have tried alot of different sharpeners and I still cant get a g

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  • I need some help. I am beyond terrible at sharpening knives. I have tried alot of different sharpeners and I still cant get a g

    I need some help. I am beyond terrible at sharpening knives. I have tried alot of different sharpeners and I still cant get a good edge. Is there a sharpener out there that is fool-proof that actually works, or are there any real good pull through sharpeners that I can use? Thanks

  • #2
    Try the Worksharp, a few years ago Dave P. reviewed it on this site, I have had one and it is easy for a novice to use effectively. I n about as long as it take to read the directions( and do read them) you will have a sharp, honed blade.

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    • #3
      The worksharp is what you are looking for. I have not used a stone since I bought my over two years ago.

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      • #4
        I use a lansky. They are pretty fool proof.

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        • #5
          I like my Lansky 5 Stone. The trick to sharpening is keeping the angle and the having the time and patience. With the 5 stone I can get a razor edge on everything from broadheads to fixed bladed hunters to my chefs and filet knives.

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          • #6
            I agree on the Worksharp. other folks really like the Worthog . If you are stuck with using a stone, remember the usual problem is keeping a constant blade angle. A couple of aids are, use a large stone, like a foot long, with a fine grain. Get a piece of 2x4 and drive three finishing nail on the back and two sides deep enough so you don't hit them as you sharpen on the stone, but allow you to slide the stone in from the front and hold it securely. The raised surface and large stone size help you maintain a consistent knife edge angle. There are all kinds of brands of sharpening lubricants for sale and all seem to work. I usually just use kerosene.

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            • #7
              Worksharp. For the reasons mentioned above.

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              • #8
                Learn to use a wet stone. Someday you'll be glad you did. also get a steel, to keep the edge straight. After lots of practice you'll be surprised how much sharper it is compared to the mechanical type.

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                • #9
                  I have both the worksharp and the lansky. When feeling lazy (to often) I go with the worksharp. When I want to spend some time getting an edge with no burs and scary sharp then its quality time with the lansky.

                  Both are great and foolproof, I feel the lansky just puts a touch nicer edge on the blade

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                  • #10
                    I use the Lansky on all my knives. Gives a great edge with a little time investment. I also have a wet wheel that gives a nice hollow ground edge. I carry a two step pull through in my pack for touch up if needed.

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                    • #11
                      I use a marvelous old 19th century Scheffield steel from an ivory handled kitchen carving set my wife got from her grandfather's farm in Saskatchewan. That thing is incredible! Sometimes (although rarely) I will finish it up a bit after the steel with two ceramic rods. But that's almost too sharp.

                      Understand that there are some knives that Gawdalmighty couldn't put a blade on. I actually despise Buck knives for that reason and the Schrade Old Timer I used for years never held a blade longer than thirty seconds. Don't be so quick to blame it on operator error. And I don't care how good the sharpening contraptions are, you can't make a silk purse out of a sow's ear. A junky knife is a junky knife.

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                      • #12
                        I think Hap said it best. All I would add is take a this piece of plastic and a protractor map and cut a 15 degree angel and tack it on the back of your 2x4. The big problem most people have is they can't visualize the proper angel and they role the blade at the end of the stroke. As far as steel goes too hard is difficult to manually sharpen. Too soft does not hold an edge. Commercially we used what was called Butcher steel [55-56 Rockwell] back in the day holds an edge easy to sharpen. A steel is used as a stop gap for over sharpening and wearing out a blade.

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                        • #13
                          The Lansky and the Worksharp are both good systems and pretty foolproof. The Lansky is somewhat tedious to use and the Worksharp needs electricity so learning how to do it with a stone is important too as you will not carry either of the above into the field.
                          I have both a Lansky and Worksharp and if I were only going to buy one it would be the Worksharp.(as long as the power stays on)
                          OHH is right in that very hard or soft steels can be a pain. Do the research and make informed choices when picking a knife. Like any tool it needs to be fit to the task.
                          Putting a sharp edge on by hand is as much art as science and takes lots of practice and often multiple steps with different surfaces, strop etc.

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                          • #14
                            I have had good results with a Smith sharpening kit. Hot Springs AR

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                            • #15
                              I used to have a cheap knock off of the lansky. You are right it was very tedious. It didnt seem to do a very good job, but maybe thats because it was a cheap knock off. I will definately look into the Worksharp. Thanks for the help.

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