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What are the best knives to cut a buck up and skin a buck?

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  • What are the best knives to cut a buck up and skin a buck?

    What are the best knives to cut a buck up and skin a buck?

  • #2
    Buck Vanguard or Cold Steel Pendleton Hunter Lite.

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    • #3
      I use a Buck knife on a buck. They don't make a Doe knife so I just use my ol single blade, folding Case pocket knife. It "does" as well as it "bucks"! LOL!
      Sorry, couldn't help myself.

      Actually, it's worse than the 06/.270 argument.
      There are so many different configurations, just grab one and go to work. Experience will tell you what works best for you.
      I carry a ceramic rod, a Case, single blade folding pocket knife and a set of lopping shears in the pickup. Cutting and boning is a set of two butcher knives.
      A Case "Trapper" or "Stockman" is a super place for a beginner to start.

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      • #4
        I used to worry and fret (AND sweat and curse!) with my butcher knives and a Norton carborundum stone. Then I found a "Smith's" sharpener my daughter left here. It's all I use now! Dull to shave in two or three strokes!

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        • #5
          I've used lock-back folders but don't like the extra time it takes to cleanse the knife afterward. My favorites for gutting and skinning have blade lengths of 3 to 4 inches. I like a pointed blade with a little upsweep. I use a filet knife when processing.
          Trump 2020 - Keep America Great!

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          • #6
            I've used a havalon knife the last 2 years and like them very much. It is a lock blade with a disposible blade. I use a long knife like a filet knife once the deer is skinned to quarter and remove meat.

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            • #7
              I also love the Havalon knives. The blades are replaceable, the blades are sharpened the same way as surgical scalpels, and come in individual hermetically sealed packets. Each blade is sharp enough to cape and quarter a whole deer and still sharp enough tho go through the P-cord I use to hang the quarters like a hot knife through butter. It only took 2 blades for me to skin and quarter a whole bull elk. The blades are also inexpensive $4 for a dozen. Way better than having to sharpen a knife in the field and I have used less than a dozen blades a year.

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              • #8
                Find a fixed blade, drop point knife with a 3.5" to 4" blade that is high carbon stainless steel and with a handle that won't slip when wet or bloody, expect to spend $50 to $100----now go to work on that deer. Keep it sharp, you won't cut yourself nearly as badly with a sharp knife as with a dull one. By the way, you can easily find cheaper knives, but spending some cash gives you a better chance of getting a lifetime quality blade that you can pass on to the next generation.

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