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What is some of the best skinning knifes that i can use to skin animals.

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  • #31
    Originally posted by DakotaMan View Post
    I use a Shrade folding knife for serious game skinning where I have multiple animals to skin. I can always do more than a dozen deer or antelope before sharpening with a steel is necessary and it cuts like a razor.

    I use my Buck 119 fixed blade for field skinning of a single animal at a time. I can get it razor sharp with a steel but it loses its razor edge by the time I am finished with one deer. It has proven to be a great hunting knife though and I've carried it most of my life.

    I worked in a butcher shop long ago where I skinned cattle, hogs and sheep daily. There, the gold standard was Chicago Cutlery professional skinning knives. I used the same knife daily and swiped it a couple of times with a fine steel before each animal. It was literally a razor. As a matter of fact, when I first started, I skimmed the knuckle of my left index finger with that knife and almost cut my finger off. It cut through the skin, the tendon and half way through the largest knuckle and I never even felt it.
    I have owned three fixed blade Schrade knives in my time and they were each junk. Hard to sharpen and wouldn't hold a blade for five minutes when working on an animal. The very worst knives I have owned was a butcher block kitchen set from Chicago Cutlery. Easier to cut butter with the handles than the blades. I think they must have been made of pewter! Still have the butcher block with steel but that is crap too. Won't sharpen a knife worth beans. Just a decoration now. The other three slots in the block are filled with Heinkle knives now.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by 99explorer View Post
      Here are some pictures of professional grade skinning knives.
      They seem to have something in common.
      The problem with design of "professional" skinning knives is they are only good for skinning. Try to gut an animal with one of those things. You'll poke a gut opening the animal up and then have to guesstimate where the end of the blade is when cutting around the diaphragm. Generally I have two hands in there working blind. Don't need to be guessing. I want the end of the blade pointing off the end of the finger holding the knife.

      prefer to have a good multipurpose knife rather than a collection of them. A four inch drop point fixed blade is tough to beat for many applications.

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      • #33
        I once bought a skinning knife with a big curved belly like the ones pictured, but with a stag handle and finger-grooves. I bought it at Hoffritz in NYC and it was expensive. I gave it to my wife's uncle as a gift, but he never used it.
        When he passed away, I inherited it, but I also never got to use it because the butcher who processed my deer did the skinning.
        Honker - Usually a knife blade that is hard to sharpen will hold an edge better than a softer steel blade the is easy to sharpen. The Holy Grail of knives would be one the holds an edge and is easy to sharpen.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by PigHunter

          OHH, the USA made Schrade knives used much better steel than those currently wearing the name. But the old company went out of business 15 years ago. I've got one fixed blade USA made Old Timer that has a 1095 carbon steel blade. That one can be brought to razor sharpness and seems to maintain the edge very well. I've got a couple of the Chinese made Schrade's and there's a noticeable difference.
          My Schrade knives were all much older than 15 years. Still have the little skinner Old Timer thrown in top of gun safe. Amazing it never wound up in the trash. A real piece of sh*t! Blade is WAY too thick. Impossible to get a blade on it and any degree of sharpness is lost in five minutes of work. The worst knife I've ever owned, hands down.

          My go to knife right now is the 1930s stacked leather 4" drop point KaBar similar to my dad's that was stolen out of his truck on his birthday about 1978. His had finger grooves and mine does not so mine is slightly older. I bought if off Ebay several years ago. Need to make a good sheath for it. I adopted the Old Timer sheath but it's too short and wrong shape for KaBar. Blade eventually cut through the stitching at the bottom.

          I will take to Africa the cheap Chinese orange camo folding knife I found on the curb last year when walking the dogs. Brand new and a very good blade. Something that will work well enough if I need it and easily stored. No loss if it winds up missing. I'll also take along an orange Mora Companion to loan the skinners to use ... and keep if they wreck it (which I'm told is a certainty). My Casio Forester wrist watch is getting rather worn. Think I'll buy a new one and donate this one to a tracker/skinner who needs a memento. The safari outfit insists on cash gratuities going through the company. I am told by several sources this is to ensure the money gets home to families and not squandered gambling or partying. Some outfitters here do the same with their Native guides.

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          • #35
            About 15 years ago my Wife bought me a an Outdoor Edge folding knife with a fine skinning blade and a blade for gutting a deer. The gutting blade is much safer than the gut hooks of old. I carry a scar on my finger from the old time gut hooks. The folding Outdoor Edge also comes with a small folding saw that fits in the same case, It is extremely sharp and goes through the pelvic bone in a hurry and also the rib cage. I also carry a Buck 110 for backup that is about 30 years old. I don't know how many deer I gutted and skinned before the Outdoor Edge needed sharpened.

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            • #36
              A coward dies a thousand deaths.
              A hero, only about five hundred.

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              • #37
                Honker, my Shrade is an old Old Timer. You can still buy them used on ebay. Still the best knife for serous skinning; razor sharp and holds it for hours of skinning. I agree with you on the modern Chicago residential Walmart cutlery. The knives I used were quite high priced and special knives made for butchers. I don't know where you get them or if they still make them. They were great though 50 years ago and I suspect they still make them but haven't searched for them.

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