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Stocking brook trout in a small creek.

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  • Stocking brook trout in a small creek.

    I have access to a plot of land with a small creek on it. I am wondering if it is possible to stock this creek with native brook trout. The creek averages 2-3 feet across and can get fairly shallow in times of drought. How large does a creek need to be to hold brook trout?
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  • #2
    Stocking with native is kind of an oxymoron. You'll want to look into the state regs. If legal it's entirely possible but you may have to buy them off the state or a hatchery. I think your smoothest route would be to contact a local state fisheries biologist. They could give you the right answers.

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    • #3
      Check with the State fishery biologist.

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      • #4
        Here is a photo from wikipedia.
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        • #5
          Talk to a biologist. With brookies, it's probably more about temperature, than size, though you need some pools of decent size if you expect to hold trout bigger than 4 or 5 ".

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Pray- hunt-work View Post
            Stocking with native is kind of an oxymoron. You'll want to look into the state regs. If legal it's entirely possible but you may have to buy them off the state or a hatchery. I think your smoothest route would be to contact a local state fisheries biologist. They could give you the right answers.
            You nailed it, only other thing I might add would be that if it could support brookies it probably does.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Pray- hunt-work View Post
              Stocking with native is kind of an oxymoron. You'll want to look into the state regs. If legal it's entirely possible but you may have to buy them off the state or a hatchery. I think your smoothest route would be to contact a local state fisheries biologist. They could give you the right answers.
              Absolutely, someone else touched on the fact that water temp and a couple of deep holes are much more important than width.

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              • #8
                Never stock fish in a lake or stream. Never!
                I bear hunted with a Maine Hunting Guide up in Greenville, Maine and he put white peach in Moosehead Lake. He caught the peach in small streams and he used the white perch for bear bait. He was fined by the Maine Fish and Game Department. White perch eat eggs of trout and salmon. Moosehead Lake in the biggest Lake in Maine and this bear hunting guide almost knocked out the entire salmon and trout market from stupidity. Let the experts do the stocking or ask permission first.

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                • #9
                  Is that a spring-fed crick? If so it may be cool enough to hold brookies through the summer. As someone else stated, they won't be native if they're stocked, but it would be cool if you could get some holdovers from year to year. Good luck

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                  • #10
                    It wouldn't be how big the creek is. It is how cold does the water stay all year round. Does it even still have water in it, in august and what is the temp. Brooks can't live in water over 72 degrees F. Also I don't know how big they will get if the creek isn't clean and healthy itself.

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                    • #11
                      Others have posted that you should contact your state fishery folks, I completely agree. As well as I think your thought process on this issue is like ......... incredibly inept

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Henry View Post
                        Here is a photo from wikipedia.
                        You going to get the trout from Wikipedia too ? YEESH .......

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                        • #13
                          The answer to your question is this. Today many states have regulations against stocking trout due to diseases and foreign species being added to the environment. Fifty years ago I would catch and transfer native brook trout to wherever I could. The streams need a reasonable flow all year, pools and cover. I probably created over a hundred brook trout streams with true natives. I would spread out thirty or so 4-6 inch fish from other native streams. Do a quick count of pools to know the number of fish it could hold. The results were almost a hundred percent success. The best streams ended up with 12" native fish, yes 12". Hatchery fish work but the results are poor compared to true natives. A major drought will say every thirty years or so may make you start over again in some places but imagine having all those private streams for yourself. Pool building increases the number of fish it can hold.

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                          • #14
                            So I, being from South Carolina, followed a carefully thought out plan and contacted a biologist for the state, and he immediately forwarded my email to the state trout manager. We had a good talk, and we agreed to do some testing on the water suitability, and if it is possible that it all works out, we may be able to reintroduce them to the creek near my house.
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                            • #15
                              I'm wanting to stock my creek with bluegill or rainbow trout. I fly fish and our creek only have minnows and I'm wanting to stock it. The creek is about 12 feet across.
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