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Big Muskie, Lake Ontario

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  • Big Muskie, Lake Ontario

    Another good-sized muskie.

    All the articles this year are making me want to go after these things. Then again, my only watercraft option right now is a canoe, which might make catching a big muskie more interesting than I'd really want it to be.
    https://www.newyorkupstate.com/outdo...pon-would.html

  • #2
    That thing looks like a first cousin to an alligator gar. How big do they get?

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    • #3
      I used to rent a boat on a inland lake near Akron. I have a 7.5 hp I put on the 14' boat. Fished for Muskie and one I caught got loose in the boat and flapped all the way to the front and back again. And it was only a Tiger Muskie.
      I believe the NY record Muskie is still from the St. Lawrence River. I have fished in that Eastern part of Lake Ontario on the way up to the St Lawrence.
      I have seen a 45" caught by the mouth of the Vermillion River and Lake Erie in Ohio. Unusual because that area is very busy with boats.
      I was at West Branch in Ohio and saw a guy launch his boat, go half way out, maybe 75yds, catch a big Muskie and have his boat back on trailer all in about 45 minutes. I think Ohio is 40" for a keeper.
      Last edited by jhjimbo; 06-24-2021, 10:16 PM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by crm3006 View Post
        That thing looks like a first cousin to an alligator gar. How big do they get?
        Record fish are in the 60lb range.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by MattM37 View Post
          Another good-sized muskie.

          All the articles this year are making me want to go after these things. Then again, my only watercraft option right now is a canoe, which might make catching a big muskie more interesting than I'd really want it to be.
          https://www.newyorkupstate.com/outdo...pon-would.html
          Go get them even if it’s in the canoe it may pull you around a little but they give up fast and don’t let them see a net.

          Comment


          • #6
            It's hard to tell with a picture. By jamming the fish into the camera lens and standing in the background, you can make a gold fish look bigger than a human. I'm guessing that musky is in the 10-15 pound range. I once caught a 30 pound northern pike and it had a four pound walleye in its throat. There is no way you could shove a four pound walleye in this fish's throat without killing it. I used to want to fish for big muskies too but that fish in the picture takes about a week of fishing on average per fish because they are so scarce.

            I've been fishing for northern pike near the arctic circle in northern Manitoba multiple times. The smallest northern I caught the first week I fished there was about the size of the musky in this picture and I caught hundreds over 20 pounds that week. My fishing buddy and I each lost a potential world record size fish that would have been around 50 pounds. My arms got so tired of reeling in big fish that I had to take a break on day 3. I couldn't hold the rod up any longer.

            Two of us fished from a canoe with a 7 horse motor and did just fine. I did have one thirty pounder jump into the boat to strike a musky plug I had just pulled out of the water. He hit the plug about four feet above the canoe and landed in middle of the canoe, he thrashed like an alligator, cut my foot severely with the rear hook, ripped the hooks off the plug after it became tangled in the anchor rope and flipped out of the canoe.

            On that same trip, another 30 pounder hit me in the chest as I was wading out in chest deep water to tie a big walleye on a stringer. To this day, I believe that he was either after the walleye or perhaps he saw my wedding ring glinting in the sun. I had snatched my hands out of the water and over my head and released the walleye when I saw the swell coming at me from out of the deep water. He hit me in the chest hard but hardly made any tooth marks as he seemed to be turning at the last second. I waded back to the canoe on shore and he followed me into 1 foot deep water. I took my fishing rod out of the canoe and dropped a giant Daredevil in front of him. He swallowed it as it hit the water and it took me about a half hour to land him.

            I know these stories sound crazy but I can tell you that fishing in the northern wilderness is like nothing you've ever seen.

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            • #7
              From a search of IGFA records, the record (all tackle) muskie weighed 67 pounds and was caught in WI in 1949.
              The current record, awaiting certification, for alligator gar (all tackle) is 327 pounds caught in MS within the last year or two.

              I believe the muskie, though I've never eaten one, is pretty good eating.
              The gar is also, but it takes some time to prep. You don't just dress and cook gar.

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              • #8
                I don't believe Musky is very good eating. Biggest Muskie was from St Lawerence.

                The New York State muskie record, which is not recognized by the IGFA, is bigger at 69 pounds, 15 ounces. The fish, reportedly measuring 64.5 inches, was caught by Arthur Lawton in the St. Lawrence River in 1957.
                A recent catch by a Guide in the St.Lawrence is thought to be 70". It was catch and release.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Solitario Lupo View Post

                  Record fish are in the 60lb range.
                  Record for NY is almost 70lbs. 69lbs and 13oz. St Lawrence River

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                  • #10
                    There’s bigger ones out there but are very hard to catch. There not known for the fish of 10,000 casts for nothing.

                    Are record here is only like 54lbs. I’ve seen some big ones caught and instead of them going for the record they just took a pic and released it.

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