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  • #46
    Knowledgeable?
    Not hardly Honk.
    You are pathetically ignorant.

    I've learned more about salmon in 3 trips to Kodiak island than you've learned in a lifetime.

    Bumbling fool, get thee away from me!

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    • #47
      Originally posted by FirstBubba View Post
      Knowledgeable?
      Not hardly Honk.
      You are pathetically ignorant.

      I've learned more about salmon in 3 trips to Kodiak island than you've learned in a lifetime.

      Bumbling fool, get thee away from me!
      Har, har! Oooh ... three trips to Kodiak to park your butt on a charter boat for what ... six days total of fishing? That's supposed to surpass what I have learned in a lifetime? Hmmm ... let's see about that. My wife and I had our first date fishing for salmon in the Straits of Juan de Fuca ... on my cabin cruiser ... which was my domicile ... for again a second year when I worked as a park ranger at Olympic National Park. Over those two years I fished every day I could get out of harbor. In the evenings I lectured about salmon to visitors at my campfire program ... while the day's catch cooked over the fire. The following year I took a permanent ranger job in Seattle and we continued to fish salmon out of Port Angeles whenever possible. I have been fishing for salmon from the same boat in Lake Suoerior since moving to Canada in 1989. Thirteen years ago I worked one season (five months) as a ranger at Brooks Camp in Katmai National Park. Trophy trout and salmon fishing was three minutes from the door of my residence. Needless to say I had a line in the water every moment possible. And yes, again my campfire program was about salmon (though this time no cooking or outdoor fire gathering due to eighty brown bears in the immediate vicinity). Then two years ago I returned to Katmai to fish ... for two weeks (one week on the same river Fitch fished). In short, I have caught more salmon in one week than you will in a lifetime. Probably more in one day. And when I did it I was often standing in river run salmon shore to shore.
      Last edited by Ontario Honker Hunter; 01-05-2021, 11:02 PM.

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      • #48
        Originally posted by Ontario Honker Hunter View Post

        Har, har! Oooh ... three trips to Kodiak to park your butt on a charter boat for what ... six days total of fishing? That's supposed to surpass what I have learned in a lifetime? Hmmm ... let's see about that. My wife and I had our first date fishing for salmon in the Straits of Juan de Fuca ... on my cabin cruiser ... which was my domicile ... for again a second year when I worked as a park ranger at Olympic National Park. Over those two years I fished every day I could get out of harbor. In the evenings I lectured about salmon to visitors at my campfire program ... while the day's catch cooked over the fire. The following year I took a permanent ranger job in Seattle and we continued to fish salmon out of Port Angeles whenever possible. I have been fishing for salmon from the same boat in Lake Suoerior since moving to Canada in 1989. Thirteen years ago I worked one season (five months) as a ranger at Brooks Camp in Katmai National Park. Trophy trout and salmon fishing was three minutes from the door of my residence. Needless to say I had a line in the water every moment possible. And yes, again my campfire program was about salmon (though this time no cooking or outdoor fire gathering due to eighty brown bears in the immediate vicinity). Then two years ago I returned to Katmai to fish ... for two weeks (one week on the same river Fitch fished). In short, I have caught more salmon in one week than you will in a lifetime. Probably more in one day. And when I did it I was often standing in river run salmon shore to shore.
        I don't give two hoots in hell where you've been, where you've fished or how many you've caught.
        You've already proved your ignorance of a salmon fillet!

        I've killed more whitetails and turkeys than you EVER will, but what does that prove?
        It don't mean she-eye-tee when it comes to identifying the streak of grey fat down the skin side of a salmon fillet!

        There is no way you've caught THAT many salmon and weren't aware of their fat streak!
        Therefore, you're lying about one or the other.
        Since you're ignorant of the fat streak, I'd guess you're lying about how many you've caught!

        Hoisted by your own petard Honk!
        '06 is correct!
        You're a liar AND a plagiarist!

        Comment


        • #49
          From honk the phony: ".....It requires the highest degree of skill, specialized equipment, and physical conditioning. ... well, that is an accomplishment few people can master. Anyone can drag a lure behind a boat or drop a minnow through a hole in the ice. Life is too short to be superficial."
          "While you were sitting on a dock fiddling with Zebco reels that were cheap fall-apart junk when made fifty years ago, I was all alone in the wilderness of Montana watching cutthroat trout rise to a fly. Or wrestling ten pound river run Alaska rainbows and sockeye on the end of a lightweight second-hand Scientific Angler 7 wt fly rod and reel......"
          "Those old wire line reels required special rods with rollers. The wire will eat a hole through regular eye type guides. Wire outfits were long ago made obsolete by downriggers."
          "I have cooked and eaten hundreds of salmon from all species and I don't recall any grey streak of fat. Open up a......"
          "If you knew anything about salmon biology, and you obviously don't,....."
          " First, I have caught and eaten maybe a thousand salmon in my lifetime......"
          "In short, I have caught more salmon in one week than you will in a lifetime. Probably more in one day......."


          Well, if it isn't ol' honk the phony, blathering his way through another post, knowing all there is to know, nobody has anything to match his rod, nobody can fish like he can, nobody has accomplished anything except the mighty honk!
          honk-honk has caught more fish, has a better secondhand rod, knows more fish biology, and in general is just one superior super human that the rest of us mere mortals. Everybody is inferior to the mighty honk!
          Gotta hand it to you, honkster, for your age, you really get around. You have told us in exacting detail about all the game you have killed, the amazing feats of tracking you have performed, the many thousands of fish you have caught, you unsurpassed excellence with both a shotgun and a rifle, and multiple more stories that tout the greatness of the mighty honk.
          Why, you have even been on a canned hunt to Africa, which you related to us all in lovely, boring, sleep inducing prose!
          Along with the forty seven or so professions you have claimed, over the years, honkster, don't you think you are getting just a little old to be performing all the deeds of the mighty honk?
          What I mean is, to have done all you have written and bragged so endlessly about, you must be approaching at least a hundred and fifty years old, even if you only stayed on your forty seven different jobs for a month at a time and only devoted a week to your outdoor endeavors.
          And, lest we forget, poring over the old magazines for a suitable story to adapt to the next installment of the mighty honk.
          And to think you can accomplish all this, fighting your way through doubled over pain, driving twenty hours non stop, and becoming a never miss deadeye of the trap and skeet range when a few years back you were never going to be able to shoot again!
          I think, in honor of all the amazing and audacious, even superhuman feats you have so regularly performed, you most probably deserve the title of the amazing might honk!

          Click image for larger version

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          The amazing mighty honk!

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          • #50
            What is the dark meat in my salmon? - Wild Planet (wildplanetfoods.com)

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            • #51
              Originally posted by Danbo View Post

              I also use Ugly Stik rods including ice fishing rods. Go to Oneida lake if you ever get a chance in November and cast stick baits from shore for walleye. Go between sunset and sunrise.
              I said Owasco causeway in that last post, when what I meant was Otisco Lake causeway. We've got too many of these O --- O names! (Then, just to make things more fun, there's Cayuga and Cayuta, and some people pronounce Keuka like 'Kay-ooka.')

              Comment


              • #52
                Originally posted by MattM37 View Post

                I said Owasco causeway in that last post, when what I meant was Otisco Lake causeway. We've got too many of these O --- O names! (Then, just to make things more fun, there's Cayuga and Cayuta, and some people pronounce Keuka like 'Kay-ooka.')
                There is a wide spot in the road (US Hwy 287) in east Texas that is the town of "Cayuga".
                In E. Texese, that's pronounced "K-U-gah".
                Long K, long U with a "gah" at the end.
                They've got a really nice little Texas "Class A" school.
                Not much of a sports program but 99.5% of the kids live in the country.

                Comment


                • #53
                  Originally posted by FirstBubba View Post

                  There is a wide spot in the road (US Hwy 287) in east Texas that is the town of "Cayuga".
                  In E. Texese, that's pronounced "K-U-gah".
                  Long K, long U with a "gah" at the end.
                  They've got a really nice little Texas "Class A" school.
                  Not much of a sports program but 99.5% of the kids live in the country.
                  Yep, that's how we pronounce it here, too. Cayuga Lake is one of the NYS Finger Lakes -- then there's Skaneateles, Seneca, Keuka, Otisco, Owasco, Canandaigua, and a few others. All words from the Iroquois language. All lakes with great fishing and lots of good trout-stream tributaries, some Atlantic salmon populations in some of them, too. (Jimbo has mentioned he used to fish one of the Canandaigua tribs).

                  Funny how a lot of the Iroquois tribes/ names have gotten around the country, when they were all located in the Northeast, mostly what's now New York. I've read, though, that some of them were wanderers -- I know the Seneca used to wage war up and down the Appalachians, and at one point there were Mohawks and Oneidas in the Wisconsin-Minnesota area.

                  And how do you pronounce "Skaneateles," you ask? Heck, even the people who live right next to it can't agree. I say "Skinny-atlas," which seems to be the most accepted.

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Yes sir, I've seen some pretty messed up spellings.
                    A couple of the best is a town near my home town.
                    "Mexia"
                    It's a Spanish word pronounced "Mah-hay-ah"
                    Just south of Waco, Texas is "Tehuacana" Creek.
                    "To-wok-a-nee"

                    One of my favorites is in north Texas.
                    "Quitaque"
                    It's a town of about 430.
                    Locals call it "kitty-quay" or "kit-a-kway"..

                    The funniest I can think of is up in the Texas panhandle.
                    The founders couldn't decide what to call their town. They finally settled on a word they kept hearing the local Indians use, "Mobeetie". Pronounced "mo-bee-tee".
                    Years after the town was incorporated, somebody finally told the towns people that "mobeetie" was the Comanche indian word for "buffalo dung"! LOL!

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Originally posted by MattM37 View Post

                      I said Owasco causeway in that last post, when what I meant was Otisco Lake causeway. We've got too many of these O --- O names! (Then, just to make things more fun, there's Cayuga and Cayuta, and some people pronounce Keuka like 'Kay-ooka.')
                      I figured you meant Otisco.

                      Comment

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