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Disease from fish

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  • ADYLATYSA
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  • ADYLATYSA
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    • viral infections, such as esocid lymphosarcoma found in Esox species.

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  • ADYLATYSA
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    Pathogens which can cause fish diseases comprise:
    • viral infections, such as esocid lymphosarcoma found in Esox species.
    • bacterial infections, such as Pseudomonas fluorescens leading to fin rot and fish dropsy.
    • fungal infections.
    • water mould infections, such as Saprolegnia sp.
    • metazoan parasites, such as copepods.

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  • jhjimbo
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    I always like to go out a few miles to swim where you don't see the trash from shore. Jump in the water for a dip right off the boat. The places to be aware would be the stagnant backwater where things can breed. I heard a case where a person picked up some kind of worm parasite from a small pond and it went through their nose and it bored right into his brain.
    https://www.webmd.com/brain/brain-eating-amoeba#1
    Last edited by jhjimbo; 04-18-2019, 06:39 PM.

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  • JasonT
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    Originally posted by Solitario Lupo View Post

    Not sure if you do. Just hear a lot of people saying not to wet wade cause their getting sick from it. I think if any infection doesn’t get treated and you let it go. You can lose limbs.
    I always use waders, thats usually when i'm duck hunting. I don't do much trout fishing so I am usually bash fishing from a bank.

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  • Solitario Lupo
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    Originally posted by JasonT View Post

    Is it flesh eating to the point they lose limbs? I'm like Matt on this one, until that happened anyways.
    Not sure if you do. Just hear a lot of people saying not to wet wade cause their getting sick from it. I think if any infection doesn’t get treated and you let it go. You can lose limbs.

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  • MattM37
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    I've gotten an infection from wet wading, albeit not from the water. I picked up a leech and stupidly just plucked it off. The bits left in me from his mouth caused this baseball-sized swelling, with pus oozing out of the bite-hole. I learned that lesson.

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  • JasonT
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    Originally posted by Solitario Lupo View Post
    What’s even more nuts is I hear that people who are wet wading with small cuts are getting infections and some kind of bacteria from the water.
    Is it flesh eating to the point they lose limbs? I'm like Matt on this one, until that happened anyways.

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  • Solitario Lupo
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    What’s even more nuts is I hear that people who are wet wading with small cuts are getting infections and some kind of bacteria from the water.

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  • Solitario Lupo
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    Originally posted by MattM37 View Post
    Think of all the things we handled when we were kids, how often we swam in cricks and rivers (and drank from them, too). Amazing we survived.

    I just thought of something: Are they certain it came from the fish itself, or could it have been something in the water?
    That’s what builds the immune system up. For those who didn’t accidentally eat some dirt of drank some nasty lake water must have a weak immune system. Haha.

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  • JasonT
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    They say all fish can carry a bacteria on their body, it can be any fish. Thats what the doc says

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  • MattM37
    replied
    Think of all the things we handled when we were kids, how often we swam in cricks and rivers (and drank from them, too). Amazing we survived.

    I just thought of something: Are they certain it came from the fish itself, or could it have been something in the water?

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  • JasonT
    replied
    Originally posted by MattM37 View Post
    Never heard of that. Not very comforting -- especially when I think of how often I'm fishing with cuts or dry-skin cracks on my hands, especially in this cold and dry time of year. Thanks for posting that good tip about bleeding -- I remember my RN sister telling me that a few years ago, but half the time, I still slap some pressure on a cut as soon as I get it.
    I never heard it either

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  • MattM37
    replied
    Never heard of that. Not very comforting -- especially when I think of how often I'm fishing with cuts or dry-skin cracks on my hands, especially in this cold and dry time of year. Thanks for posting that good tip about bleeding -- I remember my RN sister telling me that a few years ago, but half the time, I still slap some pressure on a cut as soon as I get it.

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  • jhjimbo
    replied
    Any time you get a skin break with bleeding, let it bleed some. Encourage the bleeding while washing any debris out of the wound. Blood flowing out could carry any pathogenic bacteria with it. Stop the bleeding immediately and you have in effect trapped the bacteria in the wound. Don't worry about a little blood loss, you can lose up to two units without any life threatening consequences.

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