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I went to check my trail camera on a small plot of land I was hunting with one other guy. I guess last season he made a huge me

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  • I went to check my trail camera on a small plot of land I was hunting with one other guy. I guess last season he made a huge me

    I went to check my trail camera on a small plot of land I was hunting with one other guy. I guess last season he made a huge mess, and made a permanent stand on private property when the land owner specifically told us not to. When questioned, he blamed it on me. Because I'm 13 and he whined harder he won. I lost permission to bowhunt the plot. I still have gun season dear camp but I liked archery hunting 5 x as much. now I need something to hold me over till October/mn pheasant season. Does anyone hit the spawning salmon coming into the rivers? I'm thinking about it on my tenkara rod.

  • #2
    That sucks that you got kicked off that property! Some people are just downright selfish!!!

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    • #3
      Although it is good to see kids my age on this site. :-)

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      • #4
        I don't understand how a ground blind makes a
        "huge" mess.
        If it were me, I would approach the landowner by myself and explain to him just what you said here. That it was not you that made the blind and you would be glad to 'clean up' the mess. And, that you would be grateful if he would let you archery hunt there again. That you have no other place to archery hunt.
        Never know, it may work.

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        • #5
          It wasn't a ground blind. It was a treestand that he used lumber and nails to build, and he left a bunch of wrappers and plastic bags on the ground. I tried to reason with the land owner but he was being idiotic. I'd rather find a new plot a little closer to home next spring.

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          • #6
            It sounds like you need to be a little more selective in choosing hunting partners in the future. Because of your mistake in this regard, you are done archery hunting for this season so alternatives need to be considered. The salmon and trout fishing on the great lakes is phenomenal and I have often enjoyed it even more than archery hunting in the Fall.

            My recommendation is to get to the shore line and observe the many shore/river fishermen to learn more and get some experience. September and October are when it happens. Observe their technique and talk to them to learn tactics. Not many people will be fly fishing in the Fall as most salmon and trout are caught on spawn sacs or silver spoons (e.g. a Krockadile, Mepps Aglia or Little Cleo). Putting a black streamer fly a foot ahead of your spoon increases daytime hookups about 10x (an old Norwegian trick passed on to me by my buddy from that salmon catching country). You can have great success at night by lighting phosphorescent paint on a Krockadile with a flash camera strobe. Kings like these and will top 30 pounds.

            Choosing a location and technique that allows you to share the fun with neighboring sportsman will provide you the most fun. You should plan to be considerate of neighboring fishermen and be prepared to laugh at a tangle every now and then. I've seen many who feel they own the river and that everyone else should go home... most of these people went home with ulcers rather than fish and made the day miserable for many others on their way.

            Fly fishing can be successful but I consider it more challenging, especially when hundreds of other shore fishermen are casting spoons into your drift. These rivers are not in Alaskan wilderness... when the fish are running hundreds of people come out to catch them. Sharing in their excitement can be as much fun as catching one yourself.

            With a fly rod, salmon egg flies may be the best, catching steelheads and Cohos that cruise the King Salmon spawning grounds. They can also be caught with sinking tips and brown wooly worms or streamers (black, silver, pearl). Hit the local tackle shops and get what is hot at your location. You can tie your own once you know the pattern if you like. Use at least 200 yards of 20lb backing. You are likely to encounter 20lb+ fish and they can spool you in less than 10 seconds if you aren't prepared. Keep your hooks sharp because they have soft mouths and can throw a hook like you've never seen. You need to sink a hook into jaw bone to have a chance. Test every knot to make sure it is solid because you won't find a fresh water fish that pulls harder. My best luck fly fishing has always come very late in the Chinook spawn after most shore anglers are gone and the river bottom is a couple feet deep in Chinook carcasses. Steelheads, browns and Cohos are still cruising for roe and attack those spawn flies or streamers.

            I've had best success where the river spills into the lake and under bridges where they like the shade. I suggest bringing a spinning rod and spoons as a backup in case you just can't find clear water for fly fishing. Best of luck to you and have fun!

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            • #7
              The property owner gave you his strict instructions of what not to do. Making a wooden stand could also kill the tree. A chain saw could hit those nails when cutting firewood from that tree if it died in the future.

              I would send an apology letter with a gift certificate enclosed. Also tell the land owner you can help him with some chores around the property. Send a photo of your new lock-on or a ladder stand that will not harm any of his trees.

              He may forgive and forget. It is worth a chance.

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              • #8
                This is part of life and valuable lesson. Choose your friends carefully, because you will known by the company you keep.

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                • #9
                  I can't help with the landowner, but as for salmon, I've always used a large Little Cleo on a 7 ft ugly stick, and I've never had a bad day of salmon/steelhead fishing in my life.

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