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Is a steel leader usually used in walleye fishing? I have never heard anything like this but they do have teeth, so I was just w

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  • Is a steel leader usually used in walleye fishing? I have never heard anything like this but they do have teeth, so I was just w

    Is a steel leader usually used in walleye fishing? I have never heard anything like this but they do have teeth, so I was just wondering.

  • #2
    No, wire leader is not needed for walleye. They have pointy teeth, but not the type that cut lines like pike or many saltwater fish. I’ve typically used 6 lb. line for walleye, tied directly to the jig or lure. For fishing bait on a bottom rig, I’ll use 6 lb. line for the leader – usually a low-visibility line such as Berkley “Vanish.” Of course, walleye often live in the same waters as northern pike and musky, which will sometimes go for walleye baits and cut your line. Walleye anglers typically just accept that risk because they’ll catch more walleye without a heavy leader.

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    • #3
      Never seen them used before.

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      • #4
        I've never used a leader for walleye, and I've never heard of anyone that does.

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        • #5
          No, but keep a weather eye on the condition of the mono leader. It will eventually get frayed if you catch several.

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          • #6
            I agree with the guys above. I have never used a leader and can't recall an instance of getting "bitten off."

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            • #7
              In addition, walleyes have great eyesight. That's why you should use light line and shouldn't use a steal leader. Not only can the fish see it but it will give your bait an unnatural action. Just thought id clear that up. When fishing for walleyes I never go above 6lb test.

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              • #8
                Ncarl, some of the newer mono technology is incredible. Maybe want think about raising your pound test threshold? Especially if you're fishing in waters where northerns are also found (which is usually just about everywhere walleyes are found). Even the small jackfish (which are usually quite prevalent) can saw through 6 lb test, especially if they're hitting the lure regularly. Inadvertent hookups with them is another good reason to keep a close watch on the condition of your mono leader.

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                • #9
                  OH, never have thought about changing. Southern Iowa is as far north as I regularly go north to fish. Walleyes arnt native in those waters. Iowa has a great walleye hatchery. The DNR stocks them annually and the spawn of the stockies usually have a survival rate of 1%. Using light line costs me a big bass or a catfish once in a while but I don't have to worry about running into northerns while fishing for Wallys.

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                  • #10
                    I never use a leader for walleye in Lake Erie. Most of the time I use 12# test mono. Some eyes go over 10# and i have never had a problem with cut line. I put back everything over 5# or 6# as the smaller fish are the better eating fish.

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                    • #11
                      I never use a leader for walleye in Lake Erie. Most of the time I use 12# test mono. Some eyes go over 10# and i have never had a problem with cut line. We catch Drum in the same area as the eyes. I put back walleyes over 5# or 6# as the smaller fish are the better eating fish.

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                      • #12
                        Excellent answer by Drover1 - almost exactly what i had intended to write. I would only add that I occasionally (in spring) use 10# braided with a short, lighter 6# leader of mono in one my favorite walleye locations where there are lots of rocks - this helps with losing lures/fish to abrasion. As Ontario Honker says, you should check your line frequently for abrasion no matter what kind of fish you are pursuing.

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