Top Ad

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

I'm looking to do some camping/ hiking / fishing on a road trip to North Carolina in late April. Any suggestions on what State/

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • I'm looking to do some camping/ hiking / fishing on a road trip to North Carolina in late April. Any suggestions on what State/

    I'm looking to do some camping/ hiking / fishing on a road trip to North Carolina in late April. Any suggestions on what State/National parks/forests I should look into?

  • #2
    We've thought about:

    uwaharrie national forest
    coratan national forest
    pisgah national forest
    nantahala national forest
    great smoky mountains national park
    sumter national forest (actually in SC)

    we just came up with this list from looking at a map, anyone have any experience camping and fishing at any of these parks in late April? or any other parks in the North Carolina area?

    Comment


    • #3
      Those are all great places. You could also check out Gorges State park or walk a section of the Appalachian Trail as well. Here's a link to all of our state parks as well http://www.ncparks.gov/

      Comment


      • #4
        I would hit Boone and Asheville for Pisgah and then go south to the GSMNP.

        Comment


        • #5
          Uwaharrie has massive inholdings in some sections. Makes planning from some maps sort of problematic. Pisgah would be my choice off of that list.

          Comment


          • #6
            Oh, and I used to live near Croatan, but never went because the forest's website indicated conditions were so nasty in the summer most folks weren't interested in hanging out there anytime except dead winter. Given the swamps, bugs and moccasins where I was living, I saw no reason to test their statement.

            Comment


            • #7
              Wow, that last post was downright semi-literate. Let's fix that up:

              Oh, and I used to live near Croatan, but never went. That was because the forest's website indicated conditions were so nasty most of the time that folks weren't interested in visting, except in the dead of winter. Given the swamps, bugs and moccasins where I was living, just up the road, I saw no reason to test their assertion.

              Additonally, Gorges is nice as well.

              Comment


              • #8
                I'd go to the mines and creeks just south of Ashville and dig for gems and gold. Never hurts to try a little treasure hunting while you're camping.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Great Smoky Mountains National Park
                  GSMNP has 10 developed, or "frontcountry," campgrounds, five of which are in North Carolina. Campgrounds have restrooms with cold running water, but no showers or electricity or water hookups. Campsites have a fire grate and picnic table.
                  Seasons vary (backcountry camping is permitted year-round). During summer and fall, sites at Smokemont must be reserved at (877) 444-6777 or online. Otherwise, first come, first served for single sites. Fees run from $14 to $23 per night.
                  Group tent camping, where allowed, requires reservations and a minimum party size of eight. Phone (877) 444-6777 or use the links below to register online.
                  Permits are required for backcountry camping and are free at most ranger stations and visitors centers. All backcountry shelters and some backcountry campsites require reservations. Your permit will designate the shelter or campsite you may stay in each night. Phone (865) 436-1297 for information, (865) 436-1231 for reservations.
                  Big Creek and Cataloochee campgrounds have drive-in horse campsites, which must be reserved at (800) 365-2267 or online.
                  http://www.nps.gov/grsm/planyourvisit/carcamping.htm

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Here's another place to go treasure hunting while in North Carolina.

                    The Emerald Hollow Mine is the only emerald mine in the United States open to the public for prospecting. Nestled snugly in the foothills of the beautiful Brushy Mountains, this North Carolina Emerald mine is located in the small town of Hiddenite, North Carolina. This locality is recognized as one of the most unique and interesting geological locations on the North American continent.



                    http://hiddenit.ipower.com/map.html

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Cgull,
                      Hey, Thanks for the info. and I'm definitely going to check it out!!!

                      Comment

                      Welcome!

                      Collapse

                      Welcome to Field and Streams's Answers section. Here you will find hunting, fishing, and survival tips from the editors of Field and Stream, as well as recommendations from readers like yourself.

                      If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ for information on posting and navigating the forums.

                      And don't forget to check out the latest reviews on guns and outdoor gear on fieldandstream.com.

                      Right Rail 1

                      Collapse

                      Top Active Users

                      Collapse

                      There are no top active users.

                      Right Rail 2

                      Collapse

                      Latest Topics

                      Collapse

                      Right Rail 3

                      Collapse

                      Footer Ad

                      Collapse
                      Working...
                      X