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Dying feathers yellow (naturally).

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  • Dying feathers yellow (naturally).

    This is based on instructions from Wm. Blacker’s Art of Flymaking (1855). The dye powder used is tumeric. Just simple bulk tumeric. I usually use a tablespoon or two, but the amount used depends on how much is to be dyed, and the strength of the tumeric. I am dyeing chicken hackle that that I bought cheaply off EBay.
    Step 1: mix dye bath, prepare feathers.  Just wash in soapy water to remove oil. Step 2: dye feathers. Dyed feather.

  • #2
    Some more photos.
    I hope to try other colors soon.

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    • #3
      Looks good, Henry! Thanks for sharing.
      -SSSOutdoorsman

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      • #4
        Originally posted by SSSoutdoorsman View Post
        Looks good, Henry! Thanks for sharing.
        Thank you!

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        • #5
          Henry, do you sell flies or just tie for yourself? I have a cousin that used to tie for Orvis years ago. He was a teen then, but made decent spending money at it.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by fitch270 View Post
            Henry, do you sell flies or just tie for yourself? I have a cousin that used to tie for Orvis years ago. He was a teen then, but made decent spending money at it.
            No, I don't sell them at the moment. It would be interesting to do, but I have been short on time recently, and have not even been able to tie much for myself. However, I hope to submit an original pattern for their consideration, for a small royalty.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by fitch270 View Post
              Henry, do you sell flies or just tie for yourself? I have a cousin that used to tie for Orvis years ago. He was a teen then, but made decent spending money at it.
              Pretty much all commercial fly tying is done in the orient these days (particularly Thailand). Difficult for American craftsmen to compete with undercut cost of child slave labor.

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              • #8
                Henry good to see you back! Nice post

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Pmacc60 View Post
                  Henry good to see you back! Nice post
                  Thanks! It's been a while.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Henry View Post
                    This is based on instructions from Wm. Blacker’s Art of Flymaking (1855). The dye powder used is tumeric. Just simple bulk tumeric. I usually use a tablespoon or two, but the amount used depends on how much is to be dyed, and the strength of the tumeric. I am dyeing chicken hackle that that I bought cheaply off EBay.
                    Have you tried using rit dye. I use that on my deer hair and works great. It comes in a bunch of colors I know you will like.

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                    • #11
                      Here’s the hair I dyed with some minnows I tied up. Click image for larger version

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                      • #12
                        I have tried it a couple of times, but it didn’t work so well, probably because I didn’t follow any recipe. It did work well when I dyed some polar bear. I would like to try this again with different colors, with proper amounts of RIT.

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                        • #13
                          I’ve heard people complaining about it because it’s not acidic enough. That’s because they don’t add enough vinegar to it. I do half and half. A little more vinegar doesn’t hurt. Cut everything into strips or smaller clumps. Also I like to keep the dye warm to hot during the dying. Sometimes I rinse with cold water in the middle of dying and stick it back in for darker colors. The darker the color, may take some time in the dye.

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                          • #14
                            Good advise! I may have to try again soon.

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