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I have found a good fly line lyi g in a draw; how do I determine what weight and type it is.

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  • I have found a good fly line lyi g in a draw; how do I determine what weight and type it is.

    The fly line appears to have a small double taper and weighs approximately 4ogms

  • #2
    Here's a chart you can find more by doing a search.
    Attached Files

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    • #3
      Interesting. I found a complete fly line last summer when setting up camp on an Alaska bluff. Apparently a bear had dragged a salmon up there that had stripped out and broke off someone's fly line at the backing. From the looks of the fly and leader on the end, it must have been a king salmon. The fly line took some time to untangle but it was in perfect shape. I'm guessing it was about 9 wt which is perfect for my outfit. I can now weigh it and determine for sure.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Ontario Honker Hunter View Post
        Interesting. I found a complete fly line last summer when setting up camp on an Alaska bluff. Apparently a bear had dragged a salmon up there that had stripped out and broke off someone's fly line at the backing. From the looks of the fly and leader on the end, it must have been a king salmon. The fly line took some time to untangle but it was in perfect shape. I'm guessing it was about 9 wt which is perfect for my outfit. I can now weigh it and determine for sure.
        Only weigh the first 30 feet to determine it.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Ontario Honker Hunter View Post
          Interesting. I found a complete fly line last summer when setting up camp on an Alaska bluff. Apparently a bear had dragged a salmon up there that had stripped out and broke off someone's fly line at the backing. From the looks of the fly and leader on the end, it must have been a king salmon. The fly line took some time to untangle but it was in perfect shape. I'm guessing it was about 9 wt which is perfect for my outfit. I can now weigh it and determine for sure.
          I am a bit confused. Fly line typically comes in lengths of 75' to 80'. How is one supposed to weigh only the first thirty feet accurately without actually cutting it off?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Ontario Honker Hunter View Post
            Interesting. I found a complete fly line last summer when setting up camp on an Alaska bluff. Apparently a bear had dragged a salmon up there that had stripped out and broke off someone's fly line at the backing. From the looks of the fly and leader on the end, it must have been a king salmon. The fly line took some time to untangle but it was in perfect shape. I'm guessing it was about 9 wt which is perfect for my outfit. I can now weigh it and determine for sure.
            Put the first 30' in the scale pan, and support the remainder next to and level with the scale pan, so only the first 30' is weighed.

            Comment


            • #7
              Seem to recall seeing a flyline once with the weight and taper coded in colored bands on the backing end (which is the end visible on the spool in the box). That is a great idea. Surprised it hasn't caught on.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Ontario Honker Hunter View Post
                Interesting. I found a complete fly line last summer when setting up camp on an Alaska bluff. Apparently a bear had dragged a salmon up there that had stripped out and broke off someone's fly line at the backing. From the looks of the fly and leader on the end, it must have been a king salmon. The fly line took some time to untangle but it was in perfect shape. I'm guessing it was about 9 wt which is perfect for my outfit. I can now weigh it and determine for sure.
                Like he said put just the first 30 feet on the scale hang the rest so it doesn't pull down on the scale adding more weight.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Ontario Honker Hunter View Post
                  Interesting. I found a complete fly line last summer when setting up camp on an Alaska bluff. Apparently a bear had dragged a salmon up there that had stripped out and broke off someone's fly line at the backing. From the looks of the fly and leader on the end, it must have been a king salmon. The fly line took some time to untangle but it was in perfect shape. I'm guessing it was about 9 wt which is perfect for my outfit. I can now weigh it and determine for sure.
                  I have line in 35' lengths

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    You don't even need a pan to do that.

                    Once I just took a line that I was unsure of to the post office and weighed the first 30 feet on a self serve digital postal scale in the lobby that had a metric gram option. I marked off the measured length at home before I went. Trying to measure it out in the post office would have gotten me looks. ;-)

                    Just put it on the scale. No pan. Held the remainder of the line. The weight gap between the line sizes is enough that it's obvious what size it is.

                    Boutique fly lines, line weights below a 1 Wt line, 0, 00 and 000, might prove troublesome however.


                    DanielM wrote:




                    Put the first 30' in the scale pan, and support the remainder next to and level with the scale pan, so only the first 30' is weighed





                    Ontario Honker Hunter wrote:


                    I am a bit confused. Fly line typically comes in lengths of 75' to 80'. How is one supposed to weigh only the first thirty feet accurately without actually cutting it off?

                    Comment

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