Top Ad

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

So I recently snapped the handle off my fly reel on my 8 wt. rod. I glued it back together, but I am doubtful it will hold. I just happend to drive by a garage sale this past weekend that had fishing poles out, so I stopped. He had a Pfleuger 1494

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • So I recently snapped the handle off my fly reel on my 8 wt. rod. I glued it back together, but I am doubtful it will hold. I just happend to drive by a garage sale this past weekend that had fishing poles out, so I stopped. He had a Pfleuger 1494

    So I recently snapped the handle off my fly reel on my 8 wt. rod. I glued it back together, but I am doubtful it will hold. I just happend to drive by a garage sale this past weekend that had fishing poles out, so I stopped. He had a Pfleuger 1494, from the 50's/60's time frame in excellent condition for $25.00. I bought it and according to what I have found on-line it is 4/5 wt. reel. I have been told I can put it on my 8 wt. rod and it should be just fine. The only problem I would run into is if I am salmon fishing (for example), due to the fact there isn't as much line that may be needed. I am a beginner fly fisher, and would appreciate any information anyone would care to share about this scenario.

  • #2
    It is true that just about any reel will work on just about any rod but a properly sized reel will make your rod feel lighter or balanced and provide the proper amount of backing. Drag is another topic if you expect to see a lot of backing while fishing.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thank you. I haven't put the "new" one on yet. I will find out how it feels. If need be I guess I get another reel and maybe a rod too so the Pfleuger will have a home. The Pfleuger has an awesome drag and it is actually heavier in weight than the one that came with the rod. I did pull the line from the Pfleuger to discover it has no backing at all. Usually you can see through the holes and see the backing, but on this one, there is just enough solid metal around the center that unless you know the reel, you have to take the line out to see. I mostly catch sunfish, crappie, perch, trout and bass while fly fishing. As I am still not a good caster, there isn't much fly line out there to begin with. lol. It seems I will have get some backing and re-line the reel just in case I hook-up with something big, and to be prepared for that day I am skilled enough to cast as Joan Wolf does.

      Comment


      • #4
        Indeed, if you fish for salmon, or other long-running fish, you'll probably not get enough backing in to the reel. If you just use it for bass/pike, etc, you'll probably be fine.

        Comment


        • #5
          For salmon, you will need lots of backing.
          As a rule, 30 lb. test and 150 yards should be adequate.

          Comment


          • #6
            It will work fine unless you are after 60 pound Chinooks in Alaska. I use 17 pound line for backing with big salmon and trout and you should be able to get plenty of it on that reel. You can use 10 pound line if the fish are 10 pounds or less. Sharpen your hooks and double test your knots. I've caught many salmon and trout over 20 pounds with that line weight and never had a problem.

            Surprisingly, I'd have to say that they rarely run more than 100 yards on me unless I am in a boat way offshore. They tend to flip on the surface and shake their head while flying up and down stream. I've had Chinooks over 30 pounds on that rig and they will run over 100 yards once in a while. Normally in streams/rivers I have more trouble with them getting crazy and in their frenzy to throw the fly, they flip up on shore and get the line tangled in bushes.

            I have landed many a salmon and trout over 20 pounds with 6 pound backing. Let the flex of the fly rod do the work and they will keep fighting it rather than trying to tow you out to sea. If you can't get enough 17 pound mono on your reel, you could use 15 pound braid and get even more on the spool. I just don't like to have to touch that stuff with my fingers. It's a little like a razor if you get loops of it flying around.

            FYI, I've caught more fish on a $5 garage sale reel than on any other reel I have. I've noticed that where you place your fly and how you fight them seems to be a lot more important than the price of your reel.

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks for the information everybody.

              Comment

              Welcome!

              Collapse

              Welcome to Field and Streams's Answers section. Here you will find hunting, fishing, and survival tips from the editors of Field and Stream, as well as recommendations from readers like yourself.

              If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ for information on posting and navigating the forums.

              And don't forget to check out the latest reviews on guns and outdoor gear on fieldandstream.com.

              Right Rail 1

              Collapse

              Top Active Users

              Collapse

              There are no top active users.

              Right Rail 2

              Collapse

              Latest Topics

              Collapse

              Right Rail 3

              Collapse

              Footer Ad

              Collapse
              Working...
              X