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What's a good fly rod for catching native brook trout? I have an 8wt for bass and what not and some fly pole that I'm not sure b

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  • What's a good fly rod for catching native brook trout? I have an 8wt for bass and what not and some fly pole that I'm not sure b

    What's a good fly rod for catching native brook trout? I have an 8wt for bass and what not and some fly pole that I'm not sure but it's a Garcia Conolon 7' dry fly action that I got from my grandpa that's very old and does not easily cast weighted nymphs. I'm looking for a fly rod where I can fight the fish and have fun, cast pretty heavily weighted nymphs, and that's easy to cast. It also can't be very expensive. I'd like to keep it below $100.

  • #2
    Look for something in a 3 wt with a fast action for those brookies. You can probably find something in you price range from Cabelas or Bass Pro. If you are going to use it alot, then cough up a little bit more money and get a better rod.

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    • #3
      Bass Pro has/had a 5 foot long (yes I said 5 foot) 4 weight that is just perfect for chasing Brookies in heavy cover.

      Save your grandpa’s rod for the next generation, They will appreciate it.

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      • #4
        If you are chasing Brookies on small mountain streams a Tenkara rod will be your best bet.

        A longer rod will give you better line control.

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        • #5
          Thanks for the help! I was thinking a 4 weight would probably be best for the situation and I'll definitely be taking care of my grandpa's fly rod. I've heard of tenkara but don't know much about it and I don't know if I'd have so much room for a longer rod in spring when the streams get really tight.

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          • #6
            It all depends the stream conditions and terrain around you.
            I hike up very small streams for native/wild brookies and I almost always take my 6'6" 5wt. I fish areas where I am required to crouch the entire time due to overhanging trees and shrubs and a small stiff rod makes it easier. These types of streams require very short casting strokes with great line management and the smaller stiffer rod is where it's at, plus the rods can handle light flies as well as weighted nymphs.
            In all other cases, I like a 7'6" 4wt.

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            • #7
              I would not recommend getting anything smaller than a 4-weight, mainly because they're so limiting as to what you can throw. I have a 6'6" 2-weight and an 8' 3-weight, but I never use the 2-weight unless I'm casting only dries to small fish that are all but at my feet. I actually use the 3-weight a lot, but it had a stiff action so I use a 4-weight line on it, which works great.

              Tom Rosenbauer of Orvis has said multiple times that you'll never NEED to go smaller than a 4-weight--it's just a fun option--so he always recommends that for small streams. It's big enough to cast a beadhead or tunghead nymph, but it will be a not-so-fun struggle to cast any weighted streamers with it. If you already have an 8-wt., though, that shouldn't be an issue.

              I own a lot of rods, and they came in a variety of styles and prices, but I would HIGHLY recommend you buy a Cabela's rod, especially for your price range. They're having an online sale right now, so you should be able to pick up a good rod, usable reel, and a line and leader for around $100. I own a Wind River combo in an 8-weight, and I love it. Based on what you said, I'd recommend a Wind River combo in a 4-weight. You can choose either a 4-piece rod that is 8'6" long or a 2-piece rod that is 7'6" long. (I would NOT go shorter than that.) Either one costs $119 and comes preloaded with a decent floating weight-forward line and a leader attached.

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              • #8
                Thanks for the advice. I never think I would need to go below 4 at all. My 8-weight actually is a Cabelas RLS+ and has done very well for me so far. The specific kind of terrain are small mountain streams and tight spaces. On one stream I actually had walked to the middle of a fallen tree over the river to cast to a spot.

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                • #9
                  A 5 weight 8'6" is my trout rod. Serves me well and haven't had problems with it yet.

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