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My question is regards to choosing flyline, specifically meant for tight quarter roll casting and single hand spey or skagit cas

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  • My question is regards to choosing flyline, specifically meant for tight quarter roll casting and single hand spey or skagit cas

    My question is regards to choosing flyline, specifically meant for tight quarter roll casting and single hand spey or skagit casting. It would be nice to see tim or kirk do an in-depth piece on the subject. See fist post.

  • #2
    So, I have an 8'6" 6wt. rod, perfect for the creeks and small ponds i fish for panfish and bass. The problem I have though is creek banks are overgrown and tight, and ponds always have high sides with shrubs and trees making back cast near impossible a majority of the time. I try to roll cast and can make some nice loops but it seems the line i have on it just doesnt quite have the body to completely turn over the line and leader, especially with bigger bass flies, nor does it seem to load the rod very well. I need some advice, tips, opinions, suggestions on what i can do to fix this problem. The more I look in to skagit lines, shooting heads, spey lines, various tapers and so on, the more confused i get. Should I get looped shooting heads for convenience and just use my WF line as the running line so i can change between floating, sinking, etc? can i even do that? I hear the wulff ambush heads are good and thought getting 7 weight for the bigger flies. Any advice is really appreciated.

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    • #3
      You are going to extremes mentioning short line trout fishing type roll casting, and then bringing up spey casting. There is even a big difference between standard spey lines, and roll (spey) casting, and the Skagit head spey lines. The basic problem you have with the short small water roll casting is the amount of grain wt. past the rod tip, and the fact it is much harder to load the rod with a static line as apposed to putting a full load of line in the air on standard casts. If you were only doing what you say on small water, then I'd guess a 7wt. line would work far better to short line roll cast with than a matching 5 wt. on a 5 wt rod. When I made a standard cast I'd then only put, say 25 ft. of line out in the air on the backcast, and shoot the rest to make it work comfortably. What I attempt to do at times, and if I have room, is to bring the roll cast loop of line farther back on the backcast, and HAUL the line as I make the roll cast. This creates more line speed that loads the rod besides the grain wt. of line that I have out. Skagit lines are designed with more wt, out near the end of the spey line. They can deal with less line out, and quickly load, and shoot line. Standard spey lines have longer bellies, and are designed to pick up more line off the water before "rolling" them out. Skagit lines handle the sinktip lines much better. And remember this. On standard WF. or DT lines for trout type fishing you are roll casting less than say 150 grains of wt. on a 6 wt rod lets say. On a 6 wt spey rod the line wt for roll casting(spey casting) is say 350 grains of wt.

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      • #4
        Dangle, as ive been digging deeper into this, single handed spey casting has been growing ever popular because of the ability to cast nice distances with little back cast, and many manufacturers have designed specialty spey lines and shooting heads specifically for single hand rods. Wulff ambush triangle taper and scientific angler steelhead taper lines have been mentioned quite a bit as has getting a regular double taper line 1 or 2 weights higher than what i have. I understand the main differences between these and standard spey lines are head lengths (wulffs is 20' vs normal lengths of 45' or more) and total grain weight of the line. The single hand lines have lighter grain wts but shorter denser heads to accomplish rod loading with little line out. My confusion lies in trying to figure out how to make sure my whole system would be setup right (ie. Total line weight, rod action, head length and taper). I just dont want to spend $70-80 on a line and find out it doesnt work very well. Thank you for your advice though

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        • #5
          The spey segment of flyfishing is changing/evolving as you research the rods/lines product. Spey rods have shortened up, are lighter by shortening, and more fun to play fish with. Single handers have turned to single handed spey techniques. You should watch a U-tube of Steve Rajeff casting Loomis' 10' spey single hander in a 6 wt, I think it was. You can haul using a single hander, and Rajeff throws it "way da hellin gone" in his demo. That is what I am into now as I have developed a series of wet flies I call "soft hackles" using a lot of different game bird feathers my dogs, and I have acquired, and it is super fun, and very effective to wade a riffle, single spey if you are into it,mend, follow with the rod tip, and really cover water waiting for "the big tug" The "swings the thing, and the tugs the drug." I skin out all my game birds, filled out a form to be legal to sell them with the game Dept., and am virtually giving them away to get fly anglers to show up, and describe, and show them some good patterns, and the technique we are talking about. Got a guy coming over shortly to pick up a pheasant skin, and I will give him a hun skin..total $5. Just somethin I like to do, and want to share it with others. And a number of newbies waded a riffle, and caught their very first trout doing just what we are talking about.

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          • #6
            Here's a problem. When you get into spey lines they pretty much have to be cast to see if they cast OK given the rod you are using. Been there done that. I bought a spey line for my 11 1/2 7/8 wt it says, that didn't cast worth a darn....too heavy. I then bought another one, a 6-7wt that casts fine.

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            • #7
              I recommend you simply try 6 wt double taper line with your outfit. I have found DT works much better barrel casting on small water with tight banks. You won't get the distance casts that WF line will give you but this apparently is not needed in the situation you seem to be describing. Guys around here use spey type outfits for steelhead in the spring on our so-called rivers (which would be little more than creeks back home in Montana). But they are also lobbing egg sacks, not really fly fishing per se. More like bait fishing with a very expensive cane pole if you ask me. Little or no genuine casting involved.

              You might also want to try kicking the DT line up a weight above what the rod is designed for. That might give you some interesting results if the rod isn't too noodley. I wouldn't think the casts would be long enough to generate much springboarding in the rod. Only one weight though.

              Anyway, buy a couple of good quality different types (i.e. weights and tapers) of line and give them a try. Find what works best for the situation and for your rod. You can pick up reasonably good quality line on E-Bay at unbelievable prices. Won't break the bank. DT line in particular often doesn't sell well (not like WF anyway) and vendors are sometimes dumping the stuff at a loss.

              Comment


              • #8
                And ponds? Doesn't work if you strip line back in imparting action on a wet fly. You need a goodly length of line out on the water to have the grain wt. to Spey it back out. And you do need some room behind you....can't stand on a weedy/brushy bank, and spey line out. You'd have to define the distances you need to make roll casts. I'd suspect you might only need a several grain wt. line heavier than your rod, and a 9 ft rod is more effective than an 8 1/2 fter etc. depending again on the distances you need to roll cast.

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                • #9
                  For tight quarter casting on small mountain streams I use a 6.5' #3 rod loaded with #4 WFF. The heavier line carries from the short rod while the light weight rod action makes those brookies tons of fun.

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