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Whats the easiest fly to tie for a beginner tier?

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  • Whats the easiest fly to tie for a beginner tier?

    Whats the easiest fly to tie for a beginner tier?

  • #2
    Just A Bug

    An easy to tie, but effective pattern for panfish and trout. Very effective on bluegills.

    Size 10 or 12 hook. (Mustad #3906)
    White or black thread
    Tail of white or black marabou feathers (short and puffy)
    Body wrapped of white or black chenille (small diameter)
    Small head at the front built up with the tying thread.

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    • #3
      Adams is about as easy as it gets.

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      • #4
        Woolly buggers are easy to tie, extremely versatile, and will teach you all the skills you need to tie many more flies. There are TONS of videos on youtube.

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        • #5
          bread fly for carp

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          • #6
            The one you tie to the end of your line that you bought online! I have wanted to start tying myself but I found buying them to be much more cost effective for me at this time in my life.

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            • #7
              Who said an ADAMS???! Setting in hackle tip wings properly is hard for even advanced tiers, and that is what you are talking about when you say ADAMS! I'd say if you are talking about the easiest it would be a yarn, egg pattern that fishes well for rainbows in AK, and in local streams, and rivers during certain times of year...yarn in the middle of a short shanked hook, and trim it round like an egg...split shot up the tippet, and you are fishin.

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              • #8
                There is a lot of very easy flies to tie. Wooly buggers are a good begginer fly because they're bigger so they're easy to work with and they start to teach some of the fundamentals of tying like wrapping hackle for instance. Some even easier flies are sucker spawn, some variations of hare's ear nyphms, Sow bugs, scuds, all very very easy to tie. Even elk hair caddis' are fairly easy when beggining and like the wooly bugger will catch you fish even when they look hidious!

                Tying to save money is a big misconception. It is actually more expensive to tie and until you tie for a while the look of your flies will not be nearly as good as a professionaly tied fly. BUT, catching fish on flies that you've tied is a great feeling. And that feeling along with lazy winter months is the reason why I tie.

                When I started tying the best videos I found on youtube are "tightlinevideo" and "Hans Stephenson" both have every fly you'll want to tie and they break the tying down to a nice slower step by step proccess. Good luck

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                • #9
                  I don't find tying hackle tip wings particularly challenging. Not as much as say hair wing flies like Wulff patterns (which are very good to fish with!). The fella asked about tying FLIES. I really don't consider egg patterns to be flies. Not much to be learned from tying egg patterns. Spinning hair (e.g. elk hair caddis) is not what I would recommend to anyone for a beginner pattern. Perhaps it is best to start learning with something conventional. Wooly bugger is definitely a good choice. They are typically larger hooks and also contain most of the components of a "normal" fly (head, hackle, body, tail).

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                  • #10
                    The guy asked about EASY to tie fly. No fly tying class starts a new tier out tying a dry fly because of winging. Good proportions are harder to achieve besides securing in the wing, And the standard ADAMS, the old catskill hackle tip flies are kinda obsolete anymore. Too fragil, and it is hard to set the tips in properly. And some do take your view that a salmon egg, or any fish egg artificial is not a fly, but a rather foolish approach to take. Fish food produced in the river, like the flesh flies we tie, or how about the San Juan worm that is easy to tie, that many say isn't a fly. We have aquatic worms,but we can produce a lot of unique flies that are not bug replicas that we can cast, and catch fish. No need for such narrow interpretations.

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                    • #11
                      Having said that I take your approach, and learn to tie flies that do teach you things like proportion, and tying in the tail properly, at the precise spot, then a body, maybe how to palmer a hackle over it with the right sized hackle, then whatever is up front, and to finish off without crowding the head. The guy didn't infer any of that, and I took him at face value, and just "an easy fly" to tie approach. So we both do get it.

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                      • #12
                        I also vote for the wooly bugger as the easiest to tie (though the San Juan Worm is right there as well but the need to singe taper the ends puts it in second place in my book) and it doesnt need a lot of fancy materials. I would do it in black gray or brown depending on the predominant color of your local leach population.
                        And they are right - fly tying is expensive - don't take my word for it - ask my wife! ;>)

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                        • #13
                          Wooly bugger, or just a bug that you made up, also making bass bugs out of wine corks is easy and fun.

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                          • #14
                            Wooly Bugger definitely...quick, fun, easy and teaches pretty much everything ya need to tie a number of different flies.

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                            • #15
                              Wooly Bugger, Black Nat, or a Bumble Bee especially.

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