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Several people have expressed interest in flyfishing. Enticing a fish to take the fly and and then hooking up are only part of

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  • Several people have expressed interest in flyfishing. Enticing a fish to take the fly and and then hooking up are only part of

    Several people have expressed interest in flyfishing. Enticing a fish to take the fly and and then hooking up are only part of the experience. A common "What do I do now?" comes on when when you're standing in the middle of a river and have a bruiser hooked on to a light leader as long as your rod. How do you fight and land that brute?

  • #2
    How? I don't know. You just do. It's more of an art than a science. There's no explaining it for beginners. You just have to fight a lot of fish and get good at it.

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    • #3
      Tip up. Use the flex of the rod to protect the light tippet. If he jumps let your tip down. Try to get him upstream where the current will work on your side. A lot of times the fish will go the opposite direction of your pull so you might be able to control him somewhat. Be patient. Let the drag go on the runs. When he gets close the temptation is there to horse him the last couple feet but don't. If it's a huge fish try to beach him.

      Last but not least, Pray.

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      • #4
        I agree with buckhunter in that I try and let the rod do most of the work. It is amazing how much strain the light tippets will take if you let the rod take up the shock. I like to get the fish on the rod as soon as possible. If they get downstream in the current it is time to follow them. That is when it gets interesting. It's like running over a field of boulders in roller skates. Add a little current and the fun really starts. That is where the praying comes in.
        I definitely have taken some stupid risks for fish I couldn't even legally eat but in the heat of battle you do what you have to do. Good fishing and be safe out there!

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        • #5
          keep that tip up, the line tight, and let the ROD wear that fish down...of course, try to land the fish as quickly as possible to reduce stress on the fish...

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          • #6
            I was taught to keep the rod parallel to the water until I could get the fish close enough to get it's head out of the water.

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            • #7
              What buckhunter said. Sometimes (depending on wind, current and location) I cast over them, this gives me any where from a 6-9 ft of drift depending on my accuracy. Then the current helps bring them right to my net, or close. The fish is not overworked. Othertimes when I can't get a good drift or whatever other excuse just have to bring them in. When I first started I could not imagine bringing in some of these fish around here on 6 or 7 tippet but a reel with a good drag and the rod hel alot.

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              • #8
                I've heard that you lift the rod up above your head and keep feeding line through until you can net whatever fish when he's right next to you.

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                • #9
                  1) Don't horse them in.
                  I don't know if you are just reeling the fish in, and not playing the fish. It is important to tire, NOT EXHAUST THEM...If you want to release them. If you exhaust the fish (regardless of the species), chance are you will kill it.
                  The idea is to tire the fish out QUICKLY, then reel them in. One day (please note that I did not say, "One day grasshopper..."), when you get more experience, you will be able to feel when the fish is tiring.
                  2) You may be wondering how to tire the fish out quickly. Number one: Four words....Bow To The Fish! By that I mean; When the fish starts to to run, when you are reeling it in, and your rod tip is high, immediately drop the tip and point it towards the fish. What happens is the fish will slow down and "relax" (if that is possible with a hook in your snout), when it feels no pressure. It will ususally find a calm spot to lie and rest.
                  Then start angling the rod to the side, so that it slowly pulls the fish into the current, if you are in a stream. If you are in a lake or the ocean, just keep pressure on the fish by changing the rod's position, and raising your rod.
                  By using these techniques, in a surpisingly short amount of time, the fish will tire, and you will have a lot less problems landing your fish....And releasing them to fight another day.
                  But, if you use these techniques, and want to eat them; the less they fight, the less adrenaline they will infuse into their flesh. That will make the meat taste better. I have always found that "pan-sized" fish always taste better than the bruisers. Let the big one go, to spawn moe bruisers!

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                  • #10
                    Line and rod control! Always use the index finger on your rod hand to keep tension on the line as you pull in the line or reel up slack to get the fish on the reel. If it's a big fish, I like to get the slack line on the reel so I can utilize the reel's drag or palming rim. Keep even pressure on the fish and the rod tip high. When you get the feel for the rod, you can use side pressure to tire the fish out faster, but that's another lesson.

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                    • #11
                      Let the rod do most of the work for you!

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