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  • Remember when..

    Remember the Zebco travel rod kit - casting rod that broke down in 4 pieces ? I bought the rod today at the flea market.

  • #2
    Quite rare I think, like Pintos, Vegas, and Gremlins. Pretty much junk when they were made and didn't survive long before heading to the dump. I haven't seen one in maybe thirty years. Enjoy looking at it. Not much fun to fish with. The old Johnson closed face reels were much better quality ... but still not great. Tons of Mitchell 300 reels from that era still floating around. DAM Quick open face was a big seller back then too. Both were excellent quality for their day (but not much by today's standards). As I recall the Quick reel was the first to actually use ball bearings. Gad, I haven't seen one of them for a while either.

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    • #3
      Honk always knocks things other people have but think his stuff is gilded.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
        Honk always knocks things other people have but think his stuff is gilded.
        Oh come on! Surely you've been fishing long enough to know those things were dime store bottom shelf when they were made. We used to call Zebco the Bird's Nest Special. It is a collectable today because, like the Pinto and Vega, none survived more than a few years. I'm sure if you took that to Antiques Road Show they'd tell you it's today worth three times what it sold for new (which still wouldn't be a lot). Not the Mitchell 300. Too many of them survived. So no don't use the outfit because it likely will break (and will surely get tangled up). If it's in good condition use it for trading stock. Same with the Japanese bamboo fly rod you picked up a while back. Unlike the Zebco, that bamboo rod is attractive. I mounted my granddad's rod with my dad's Shakespeare auto reel on a pine burl plank with simple corner molding trim and it looks outstanding. I guarantee if you did that to your fly rod, you'd sell it for $150 easy. I put this one up in my daughter's taxidermy booth at shows and it probably gets more attention than any of her mounts. Had lots of offers but of course can't sell it. You can find those reels or identical Japanese knock-offs at flea markets all the time. Like the Zebco, they were very popular in their day (and cheap) but no one uses them today. PM if you're interested in how it is mounted.
        Click image for larger version  Name:	fly rod 1.JPG Views:	0 Size:	98.6 KB ID:	742754
        Last edited by Ontario Honker Hunter; 08-20-2020, 09:33 AM.

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        • #5
          See, there you go again - can't help yourself. You think everybody has shit for possessions but your things are primo. Get lost. The rod I bought is in 99% condition, no reel. I won't use it but it would make a terrific small fish rod - very lively.
          My fly rod is a complete set and I would never split it up. It is like new and complete. My least expensive gear in fair condition is 10 times better than your stuff. I don't get in pissing contests.
          What is this about you shooting birds on the ground - you probably pull the wings off butterflies to. What a guy.

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          • #6
            Some of the old stuff still works today. Best places to find antiques are at the flea market or garage sales never know what you’ll find.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
              See, there you go again - can't help yourself. You think everybody has shit for possessions but your things are primo. Get lost. The rod I bought is in 99% condition, no reel. I won't use it but it would make a terrific small fish rod - very lively.
              My fly rod is a complete set and I would never split it up. It is like new and complete. My least expensive gear in fair condition is 10 times better than your stuff. I don't get in pissing contests.
              What is this about you shooting birds on the ground - you probably pull the wings off butterflies to. What a guy.
              You said you had the "kit." As I recall that included the reel. So you don't have the complete set? Not worth much I'm afraid. Go ahead and fish with it. No collectable value. But be careful. With so many steel ferrules those early fiberglass pack rods were prone to break above and below the joints. The advent of carbon rods and their continuous joints made a big difference with longevity of multipiece rods. The joints are more flexible. Also no glue to come undone. Biggest advantage is that they come apart easier than steel ferrules.

              It is what it is. Just trying to be helpful. Putting your bamboo rod on display like I did would not "break it up." I can remove my granddad's rod any time in a minute or two. If you mount it that way and keep the box/paperwork, you will have a very hot trading item and I know you're really into that. It's something an outdoorsman collector can put on the wall rather than just stick in a box in a closet. Those Jap bamboo rods were mass produced and very inexpensive. Even in the original box they're not worth a lot as a collectable. Make a presentation piece out of it and you'll have something of interest for trade. If it was an Orvis bamboo rod in good condition that would be a different matter. Very expensive luxury item. Usually custom made with owner's name on them and serial number. Also lifetime warranty. Find one of those in good shape with original bag and tube at a good price, snatch it up. They are still very desirable for fishing by aficionados (last I knew Orvis was still making them to order) for the ambience more than anything I think.

              Perhaps the subject you're referring to was shooting crippled ducks on the water? I don't often have to do that because I have retrievers. But for some ducks it is definitely advisable even if a good dog is available. Divers (which I almost always avoid shooting anyway) will keep going down and staying out of reach. Dog won't give up, gets exhausted, and drowns. It happens. Also if several ducks are downed at once, it's best to have them all dead ASAP so one doesn't get away before the dog can catch it. Similarly, letting a dog go after a crippled honker is risky business. You never know when a cripple will turn aggressive and a dog in deep water has no chance if that happens. Hard to help without shooting the dog too (usually by the time the dog needs help they're out of range anyway). If possible I always try to kill a crippled goose on water before the dog gets to it.

              Or maybe you were talking about shooting grouse on the ground? It's the way they are hunted out West and up here. Most people shoot them with .22 rifle. Almost no chance they will run or fly off banged up. Also no chance of biting into a hidden pellet at the dinner table. I'm not sure I see how a clean humane kill every time is somehow unethical. Maybe it's not "sporting" in your book but I think the grouse would prefer a quick death to possibly a lingering one. Seems to me the pulling wings off the butterfly analogy better fits the hunter who insists on taking risky shots at grouse on the wing. We don't shoot deer from treestands over bait or food plots (actually, I recently learned that our illustrious Conservative Ontario government made baiting deer legal two years ago, apparently at the behest of outfitters catering to lazy Eastern Americans who do it that way ... a lot of opposition to that crap and probably/hopefully will be revoked this fall). You and I hunt in different worlds. Quite frankly, if I had to hunt in yours, I would put my guns up. Driving around an ATV on posted land is not my idea of a good time or fair chase. I stalk game on foot on publicly accessible land (except in South Africa where there is no public land hunting). The animals I hunt here are wild, not cultivated. For you it's about deer camp. For me it's about being outside with my dogs every second possible. I can socialize during the off season. Hunting season is about hunting. You do it your way. But it's not for me. Is my way better? Not saying that. You be the judge.
              Last edited by Ontario Honker Hunter; 08-20-2020, 02:50 PM.

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              • #8
                Honk can't read. I said he is shooting birds on the ground - not the water. Real Sportsman?Shooting Grouse on the ground - what a putzzz. I have grouse walk up to me when I am deer hunting.
                My Zebco rod has metal ferrrrules.
                My Jap bamboo rod made during the occupation is a collector set - mine is still covered. They bring upwards of $100+ I have no use for Orvis, that is for snobs like you.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by jhjimbo View Post
                  Honk can't read. I said he is shooting birds on the ground - not the water. Real Sportsman?Shooting Grouse on the ground - what a putzzz. I have grouse walk up to me when I am deer hunting.
                  My Zebco rod has metal ferrrrules.
                  My Jap bamboo rod made during the occupation is a collector set - mine is still covered. They bring upwards of $100+ I have no use for Orvis, that is for snobs like you.
                  I have probably put a hundred grouse in my daypack while elk/moose hunting (easily a hundred). Shot them with a .22 pistol in Montana and slingshot here (handguns are not legal for hunting in Canada). They tasted very good. The ones you saw not so much. Again, you need to ask yourself if you were the grouse which way would you want to die, quick or slow. A "sportsman" isn't supposed to care about that? And what happened to your espoused "if it's legal, it's ethical"? Yes, it is legal here and in every state I lived in out West.

                  How did you determine that rod was made during the Occupation? I have no interest in an Orvis rod of any sort. I'm not a collector or an aficionado. My equipment is a Hurricane "Redbone" 9 ft graphite (Hurricane taken over by South Bend several years ago) and 3M System 2 in 8-9 wt. The reel is about worn out. Both nearly new off ebay before I went to work in Alaska. Actually, the rod broke when up there and was replaced by factory. I also have a 7 wt Scientific Angler rod for smaller fish. All the equipment is at least twenty years old and nothing fancy when it was new. My fly vest is also a Hurricane ... a Christmas present from my folks in 1962. It is pretty much worn out but I hang onto it for sentimental reasons. Here's the vest and big rod outfit in Alaska. I just finished wrestling a foul hooked sockeye down the river and a quarter mile out into the lake (note the water line on my vest). Get your arms up and their ass out of the water fast or they'll take off with everything on the reel. An experienced fisherman can tell almost immediately when one is hooked wrong.
                  Click image for larger version  Name:	pat fishing.jpg Views:	0 Size:	150.1 KB ID:	742780
                  Edit: Actually that may be the lighter 7wt Scientific Angler rod. The guide spacing looks a bit tight. If I could see the rest of the cork I could tell for sure (heavy rod had fighting butt). Thinking back about it now, when this photo was taken by my boss I may have been waiting for the factory to send replacement for big rod (broken by a large fresh sockeye). I think it's why I had difficulty horsing that foul hooked salmon. Didn't want to risk breaking my backup rod. It's all I had left to fish with.

                  The waders are indeed Orvis. Silver Medal model bought new off ebay for a song. They were discontinued and clearance sale. Great stuff. Used the hell out of them and never leaked. On my second pair of wading boots for them. This latest pair is Redington I think. Not top end but good stuff. No sense in buying fancy wading boots. They don't last very long no matter who makes them.
                  Last edited by Ontario Honker Hunter; 08-20-2020, 04:11 PM.

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                  • #10
                    As I recall the Quick reel was the first to actually use ball bearings. Gad, I haven't seen one of them for a while either. Showbox jiofi.local.html tplinklogin
                    Last edited by EVAKATY75; 12-22-2020, 05:07 AM.

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