Top Ad

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Whopper Plopper?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Whopper Plopper?

    Does anyone have any experience with the Whopper Plopper lures? I've been hearing some good things. My bass-fishing is mostly for river smallmouth, with a bit of largemouth fishing in shallow, weedy crappie-pickerel ponds.

  • #2
    Don’t know how they work with bass but they work great for Muskie. Get them in the bigger size.

    Comment


    • #3
      For ponds my all time favorite is the jitter bug early in the morning, nothing like watching the water surface explode.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by JasonT View Post
        For ponds my all time favorite is the jitter bug early in the morning, nothing like watching the water surface explode.
        I like 'em, too. Pop-Rs and prop-baits are fun, too. Lots of times in the summer, I hit one of those ponds on my way home from the river, just for that last hour before sunset. The one I fish most is back in the woods a ways, more like a small lake that's half swamp, perfect place for quiet topwater fishing. Quiet until the strike comes, that is.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by MattM37 View Post

          I like 'em, too. Pop-Rs and prop-baits are fun, too. Lots of times in the summer, I hit one of those ponds on my way home from the river, just for that last hour before sunset. The one I fish most is back in the woods a ways, more like a small lake that's half swamp, perfect place for quiet topwater fishing. Quiet until the strike comes, that is.
          Yes I have a few ponds like that, I like in the morning early when the fog just starts to lift. Throw them out move a little stop and hold on to the rod 😁

          Comment


          • #6
            Ya'll just caught my two favorite times. Early morning with mist rising and right at sundown. Love it when Ole Bucketmouth comes up to take that Hula Popper or Jitterbug! Will have to look at these Whopper Plopper lures.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by crm3006 View Post
              Ya'll just caught my two favorite times. Early morning with mist rising and right at sundown. Love it when Ole Bucketmouth comes up to take that Hula Popper or Jitterbug! Will have to look at these Whopper Plopper lures.
              I saw them on a YouTube channel, NDYakAngler, this guy who fishes smallmouth rivers from his kayak. He gets some nice ones, and does a good job getting the action on camera. The lures are kind of pricey, around fifteen bucks apiece.

              Comment


              • #8
                Wait for them they go on sale buy a couple get one or they just go on sale. I don’t think I have paid that much for them yet. Unless they are the popular ones.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by crm3006 View Post
                  Ya'll just caught my two favorite times. Early morning with mist rising and right at sundown. Love it when Ole Bucketmouth comes up to take that Hula Popper or Jitterbug! Will have to look at these Whopper Plopper lures.
                  One of my favorite memories with my grandpa, he used to take me bass fishing and would point out places where they laid. He either used jitterbugs on top or a 7" black rubber worm with a pink stripe with a light sinker. Those where his two favorite setups. I don't have a picture anymore but when I was eleven I caught a 9 pound 24" largemouth with his cherrywood rod and a jitterbug. I do have a picture of him somewhere with the very first legal muskie caught in pa back in the 50's when they reopened the season.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    A Jitterbug figures large in our family folklore, too. I don't know how many fish it caught, but once it caught my mother right in the forehead. Story goes, she and Dad were fishing in a johnboat on a lake in the Adirondacks. He'd probably had a few beers. Luckily he'd remembered the needle-nose pliers.

                    That Jitterbug was one of the old red-and-white ones. Dad had given up fishing long before I came along, but some of his tackle was still around. I remember he had a bunch of those big old Heddon plugs, too, the ones with the big metal lips. The smaller one was the River Runt; I can't remember what the bigger ones were called.

                    According to Mom and my older siblings, he loved fishing for pike with big plugs. Never cared about bass, was always after the pike, and didn't like to use spoons for some reason.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by MattM37 View Post
                      A Jitterbug figures large in our family folklore, too. I don't know how many fish it caught, but once it caught my mother right in the forehead. Story goes, she and Dad were fishing in a johnboat on a lake in the Adirondacks. He'd probably had a few beers. Luckily he'd remembered the needle-nose pliers.

                      That Jitterbug was one of the old red-and-white ones. Dad had given up fishing long before I came along, but some of his tackle was still around. I remember he had a bunch of those big old Heddon plugs, too, the ones with the big metal lips. The smaller one was the River Runt; I can't remember what the bigger ones were called.

                      According to Mom and my older siblings, he loved fishing for pike with big plugs. Never cared about bass, was always after the pike, and didn't like to use spoons for some reason.
                      My pap never used spoons or spinners either, I found the pic by the way
                      Attached Files

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Looks just like my dad, same cap, same smoke in the corner of the mouth, same white T-shirt.

                        Funny, I got to remembering how he and a lot of my old uncles were always talking about pike-fishing. It was always a big event to go up north for pike. I think maybe because in the 50s and 60s, the Lake Ontario salmon fishery was not yet established, so pike were the big-game species to go after.



                        Comment

                        Welcome!

                        Collapse

                        Welcome to Field and Streams's Answers section. Here you will find hunting, fishing, and survival tips from the editors of Field and Stream, as well as recommendations from readers like yourself.

                        If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ for information on posting and navigating the forums.

                        And don't forget to check out the latest reviews on guns and outdoor gear on fieldandstream.com.

                        Right Rail 1

                        Collapse

                        Top Active Users

                        Collapse

                        There are no top active users.

                        Right Rail 2

                        Collapse

                        Latest Topics

                        Collapse

                        Right Rail 3

                        Collapse

                        Footer Ad

                        Collapse
                        Working...
                        X