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I use spinner reels. Recently I started bass fishing. My spinner reels keep breaking. I buy a new pole each year (usually Shakes

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  • I use spinner reels. Recently I started bass fishing. My spinner reels keep breaking. I buy a new pole each year (usually Shakes

    I use spinner reels. Recently I started bass fishing. My spinner reels keep breaking. I buy a new pole each year (usually Shakespeare). I had one for 3 months then the reel broke. I bought a new one less than a month ago and it broke as well. Are spinner reels not good to use for bass fishing? The smallest bass I have caught so far was about 1 and a half pounds but the second pole was a heavy duty reel. I noticed while watching major league fishing that they all use baitcasters. Is that what I should be using? What is the difference between a spinner and a baitcaster? What kind of lures should I be using too? Is the bass pro tournament rod/reel combo a good one? I just use salmon eggs and it works out. I have some lures but I don't really know where to start because there are so many. Thank you!

  • #2
    a spinning reel and shakespeare ugly stick medium action rod will suit you fine. It has for me over the last 20 years. I use 10 lb test line on all my bass rods unless I am going into thick cover. Then I will respool with 15 lb test.

    Some basic lures that I don't leave home without are:
    1. Top water popper (early morning or late evening)
    2. White or pumpkinseed swirltail grub with 1/4oz jig head. Great for smallies but largemouth will take them too.
    3. White or white and dark green spinnerbait with 2 willow leaf blades. Allows you to cover a lot of water and produces a lot of vibration.
    4. A "broken-back" rapala in bluegill color.

    Experiment on what works in your area and on your waters. Keep notes if you need to of weather and water conditions, what lures worked, what didn't, and how you were operating them. Hope this helps get you started.

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    • #3
      Spinning gear is fine for bass. The pros use baitcasters because they can be more accurate in a cast, but it takes many, many years of practice to get to the point where you can tell the difference.

      I suspect your problem is, no offense, that you are buying junk reels. I know that the cheap reels are attractive, but with the money you have spent on multiple cheap reels, you could have bought one quality reel. I have Shimano Saharas that are older than many posters on this board. I see that Cabela's now has them on sale for $60, which is a steal. I don't know about other brands, but I think any Shimano over $40 would save you money in the long run, as it would last a lot longer than your Shakespeare.

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      • #4
        Shakespeare does make some good products, but you need to watch which series you buy. Plastic frames and plastic gears will not hold up as well as metal. I my collection, I still have some old Mitchell reels by Abu which were built in the fifties and they still function well. My wife fishes with the Johnny Morris Signature series JM20's and JM40's from BPS which are excellent quality. I personally use baitcast reels just because I learned to fish with one, a South Bend 550A, back in the early fifties so I have been using them for close to sixty years. Also any reel is only as good as the way it is treated and maintained. Spinning reels will end up with twisted line eventually so keeping fresh line on them will greatly enhance their performance.

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        • #5
          I agree with Greenhead on this. Buy a good quality reel. The ones they sell at Wal-Mart and other places are made for bluegill not bass even though they are bass rods. If your budget is slim Abu Cardinal series is an ok buy for the money or if you can get a Revo series they are every bit worth the money. Shimano Curado is a good reel as well as some of their other mid range reels. Quantum's are iffy but they do have some good reels I have a Quantum Cadillac which is a Dix Sporting Goods line that is still in use after 6 years. As Santa said check them out before purchasing them to see what they're made of. If you can afford $150 dollar rod and reel I recommend a Abu Vendetta Rod and the Shimano Curado reel or Abu Revo S reel, this will last you for years. If you can afford more the Abu Vendetta or Veritas rod and the any of the Abu Revo series reels. Regardless I would splurge on the reel then buy a better quality rod in the future.

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          • #6
            Like others have said, spinning rigs are fine for bass fishing. Baitcasting rigs are great too, it’s mostly personal preference. Also as others have said, some of those cheap combo rigs from big-box stores work well at first but don’t hold up very well. I’d be curious to know what specifically “broke” on your reels? You don’t have to spend a fortune to get a pretty solid setup. Others have mentioned “Ugly Stik” rods, which are good, sturdy rods for about $30. This spring I bought a Mitchell “Avocet” reel for about $30, and so far it seems like a good reel for the price.

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            • #7
              I take the same stance as Greenhead and Dcast. I've only fished a few tournaments but have been chasing bass for years. The pros use baitcasters for powerfishing, when they want to fish crank baits, spinnerbaits and jigs. Spinning reels are used for finesse fishing, like the wacky rig, drop shotting, and shake thread. You can probaly get by on a spinning set up. Buy from brands like Abu Garcia, quantum, shimano, Diawa, lews, and a few others. Get the reels cleaned before you use them, just replace the factory grease. Rods are a little more complicated i think, some will break some wont, I suggest going to BPS, gander mt, or cabelas and ask them for help, tell them what you want and your price range and the should be able to work from there. Every lure on the market will catch fish, you just have to know where to use them and when to use them. There are so many articles and videos online to help. Start with one technique and master that first, then master others. It is a lot easier to buy stuff and learn if you have somebody to go with u.

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              • #8
                These other posters definitely know what they're talking about. Buy a little more expensive reel and you'll be golden.

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                • #9
                  Cabela's is always having sales, so I would recommend getting an Abu Garcia. They are nice, high quality, but also rather pricey. The Orra is on sale for $60 right now, so I would get it.

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