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I am currently looking for a new bass fishing spinning rod and reel (NOT COMBO). I am thinking of the 6'6" medium action St. Cro

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  • I am currently looking for a new bass fishing spinning rod and reel (NOT COMBO). I am thinking of the 6'6" medium action St. Cro

    I am currently looking for a new bass fishing spinning rod and reel (NOT COMBO). I am thinking of the 6'6" medium action St. Croix Triumph and an abu garcia orra for the reel. The total cost of rod and reel must be $175 and under. Any suggestions? I fish from shore (limited back cast) so it shouldn't be longer than 7', but it needs to handle six pound bass.

  • #2
    I have worked on and designed fishing reels most of my life. Spinning reels put one complete twist in line for every wrap around the spool during every cast. The bail then puts one twist in the line, but in the opposite direction for every wrap of line put back on the spool during retrieve. Thus when everything works properly the line ends up back on the spool with no twists. But if while the line is off the spool, a fish slips the drag then one permanent complete twist is put in the line for every complete turn of the normally stationary spool. If a person still cranks the reel handle while the clutch is slipping, you can multiply the number of twists by the gear ratio of the reel. So the larger the spool diameter, the less wraps are needed to hold the desired amount of line for fishing. The less wraps mean less line twist. Therefore, always look for the largest diameter spool that you can find. I personally lean toward the Johnny Morris reels because of the diameter of the spool myself. The ORRAS40 has a gear ratio of 5.8:1 and only retrieves 33" of line for one turn of the handle whereas the Johnny Morris JM40 has a gear ratio of 5.1:1 and retrieves 36" with one turn of the handle. Thus the JM40 has a roughly 24% overall larger spool diameter over the ORRAS40. Another added advantage of larger diameter spools that I have found is that I can cast them greater distances even into the wind which is a plus when fishing from shore.

    As to a rod, since you are limited to the back for casting room, you need to be able to load the tip of the rod so that the rod shoots the bait/lure much like a bow shoots an arrow. To do this the tip of the rod needs to form a shape when loaded that looks like a french curve. Most people just use the rod to make their arm longer giving added leverage to the cast, but if you load the rod and let the stored energy form the loading cast the bait, you can cast much further with less effort. Since you are not depending on length of the rod for leverage, a shorter rod will work and give satisfactory results.

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