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So I love the idea of using a baitcaster but i usually birdsnest my reel probably 1 out of every 3 casts :/ any suggestions on

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  • So I love the idea of using a baitcaster but i usually birdsnest my reel probably 1 out of every 3 casts :/ any suggestions on

    So I love the idea of using a baitcaster but i usually birdsnest my reel probably 1 out of every 3 casts :/ any suggestions on how to practice?

  • #2
    Not my idea, so I don't know how it works, and I am not taking credit. I read a tip on here to strip out a couple casting distances worth of line. Then put a piece of electrical tape on the line on the spool, and reel in the line you have stripped out. Then when you case if it does backlash it can only to to the tape. Again. not my idea, and I have not tried it yet, so I don't know how it works.

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    • #3
      My friend tried the tape thing, and didnt like it. Ryan, set your breaks to an easy casting level, and as you get more comfortable casting short distances with the breaks high, start making longer casts with less breaks. PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE. More in depth help at thebasscollege.com if you want to join a forum specifically for Bass fishing.

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      • #4
        Turn your bail tension all the way up to like 7. Then once you start to get good at it turn it back down. You'll notice a huge difference in casting distance.

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        • #5
          Ryantheking, I was on the design team that built the first ergonmic disengaging levelwind reel for the bass fishing industry back in the early seventies. (the Lew's BB1 manufactured by Shimamo). So working with the very first of these reels we also had to write the books on casting them. I will be glad to help with your casting problems if I can.

          The best way to learn to cast is to start from scratch and unlearn what you have been doing to cause backlashes. I recommend we start with the reel itself first. The number one mistake is overfilling the spool. I even catch myself doing it sometimes. The problem this creates is that you end up with none of the edge of the spool exposed to use as a surface to thumb. You do not thumb the line!!! The line is wound loosely on the spool and thumbing it at the surface of the exposed line can still let the spool rotate just a little after you brake the line with the thumb. After several times of doing this, enough slack can build up down inside the spool to start a pretty nasty bird nest. You may not ever notice this type of slack down in the spool because you have been thumbing the line and on the surface it will seem tight. So you need about one eight of an inch of spool exposed to use as a brake drum for the thumb. Most manufactures will put some type of a mark on the spool to help to know where to fill it but while learning, I suggest to underfill it even a little more to let your thumb get used to thumbing the spool edge. Also I suggest that you use a very soft mono line such as Sufix Elite in about 10# or 12#. You can use any line you want later when you get more proficient. It is just a big waste to have to cut off a huge backlash of expensive line and staying with an easy to cast cheep soft mono just makes good sense during the time that you are still learning the basics. Next how you hold the reel to cast is important. If you are right handed and are giong to cast with your right hand, turn the reel 90 degrees in your hand so the your thumb automatically goes to the left side of the reel and spool edge. When the reel is turned this way, you will not thumb the line because pushing down with the thumb will hit the edge of the spool. You would have to move your thumb sideways to thumb the line which is not a natural movement for your thumb. I have spent so much time on this because I see pro bass fishermen/fisherwomen do this wrong all the time. Just because 27 million people do something wrong does not mean that that it is right and that you have to do it wrong also.

          Now for the rest of the basics:

          Start out with at least a 5/8 once or heavier casting plug to practice with. I use large automotive valve stems for practice weights. They are rubber and do not get caught in the yard grass where I teach casting. I iust take a needle and poke a hole through the screw on cap to run the line through and tie a big knot in the line that will not come back through th hole. Once you have practiced with the heavy weight and get it down pretty good then start to cut back on the weight. Do not try it the other way around.

          Do not try to cast into the wind until you have a good level of proficiency.

          There are two type of cast controls on most reels. One is a friction control that adds friction to the end of the spool shaft and the other is a spool speed governor. The governor may be different from reel to reel, but two basic types are pretty common. One is centrifugal where small weights are slung outward against a braking surface. This system requires you to preset the number of weights that you will be using during the casting. The other system is a magnetic governor. In this system you generate a small electrial current and it takes power from the spinning spool to do it just like when the engine in your car slows down some when your turn the headlites on. The air gap bewteen the rotating spool and the fixed magnets determines how much load is put on the spool. The control knob for the magnetic control moves the magnets and adjusts the air gap.

          Set the friction on the end of the spool shaft until the casting weight will just slowly esae to the floor with the reel tripped. When the casting weight hits the floor, the spool should stop instantly. Turn the centrifugal control weights to the full on positions. You can start backing off on the centrifugal cnontrol weights until you feel comfortable. It is the same for the magnetic control. Start with the highest number and slowly back off until comfortable.

          I hope this helps and feel free to ask me any questions about it.

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          • #6
            I suggest switching to a spinning reel.

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            • #7
              @ontarkio honker, spinning reels are great however he wants to use a baitcaster, when i started casting one i put a 1/2oz weight on and casted at a bucket, make sure the line tension is pretty tight to start out with, then as you get better you can let more line out, i usually like my line coming out pretty fast but i have used one a while, my brother just barely has line falling and it works good, annd make sure there isnt any brush you can catch when you bring the rod back

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              • #8
                Practice..Practice..Practice & try tightening or loosening the cast control knob on the side everytime you change lures and if you birdsnest again then it might take a little more to cast it farther but just tighten it a little more.

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                • #9
                  until you get it just how u want and then after that youll begin to get the hang of it and then itll be easy!

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                  • #10
                    There's no other way to "educate" your thumb other than practice. I stood on my truck's tailgate and wore out my arm and thumb learning to cast an Ambassadeur 5000C. Time well spent because I can cast ANY baitcaster, even saltwater Penns up to 4/0. My Dad used to laugh and tell be to get a rooster to pick out the over runs but he's stuck with spinning gear.

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