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when buying a small fishing boat, if everything about the boat looks good, and there is no damage at all or rust and no leaks, w

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  • when buying a small fishing boat, if everything about the boat looks good, and there is no damage at all or rust and no leaks, w

    when buying a small fishing boat, if everything about the boat looks good, and there is no damage at all or rust and no leaks, would it matter that the boat was made in 1960?

  • #2
    Depends on the materials.

    All metal, ye may be OK.

    Fiberglass gets brittle over time.

    Any hole in the transom means it is probably rotten.

    Wood boats become brittle over time.

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    • #3
      The damage done by the passage of time may not be readily apparent. Blackdawgz is right.

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      • #4
        I have a 15 foot 1948 Duracraft and it has much thicker aluminum than todays boats. If aluminum has set in salt water very long the electrolysis can eat the aluminum untill it's paper thin, this looks like a powdered effect. I'd stay away from any aluminum boat that has this powder looking area. Another problem to look for is disimular metal corrosion. Any rust on an aluminum boat can and probably means there is some corrosion around the rust area. Like BD says, Fiberglass ages and can get weak, look for soft spots and pay close attention to the condition of the transom. I see more transom problems in boats than anything else. There are older boats that are in great condition, just make sure your not buying a death trap or a headache.

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        • #5
          I sailed a 1962 sloop for years before selling her and to my knowledge she is still sailing. As with any boat TLC goes a long way.

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          • #6
            Are you still looking at the two boats in your earlier post? If so they seem to to be ok from the pictures. Wood will rot if not taken very good care of, so if you are looking at a wood hull, take a sharpe knife and lightly push it against low areas where water could have sat. If it feels slightly soft or the blade beaks the surface, shy away from it. Fiberglass polymers will degrade from exposure from untraviolet light. Most fiberglass boats from the 60's were made with untreated plywood reinforcing. This wood is famous for rotting out in the transoms. Aluminum boats are subject to corrosion. An often overlooked property of aluminum is fatigue. The grades of aluminum that were used in some early boats suffered badly from fatigue. These boats show cracks in the ribs and along bent edges. I was the one that favored the flat bottom boat in the two that you first posted. I should explain. The V bow would split the waves and handle rough water without a lot of hard pounding, but the boat in your post had a round bottom at the stern. This would make the boat roll more from side to side and not be as stable while you are actually fishing. I opt for a more stable fishing platform myself.

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